Professional advice

Professional advice

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PREMIUMPresident will tour regions to promote omnibus bill on job creation: Airlangga

first_imgLinkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Google Forgot Password ? omnibus-bill-on-job-creation omnibus-law Airlangga-Hartarto Jokowi discourse President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s administration submitted the controversial 1,028-page omnibus bill on job creation to the House of Representatives on Feb. 12, expecting the deliberations to conclude within 100 working days.The Jakarta Post’s Nezar Patria, Esther Samboh, Adrian Wail Akhlas and Margareth S. Aritonang recently sat down with  
Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto to discuss how the omnibus bill on job creation will ease doing business, attract investors, create jobs and boost economic growth.With protests becoming increasingly virulent from labor unions to environmentalists and human rights groups to regional governments, Airlangga said that public objections could be delivered to the House, which is in charge of deliberating the bill. President Jokowi and the government will also tour regions… Log in with your social account Facebook Topics :last_img read more

PREMIUMBusiness concerns shift to Europe as China begins to recover from COVID-19

first_imgGoogle Log in with your social account Suparman, a worker at a coffee machine factory, parked his motorcycle at the parking lot of Panbill Mall located in the Panbil Industrial Zone on Batam Island in the province of Riau Islands on Thursday morning.He was eager to get back to work at the factory after having been sent home for five days. The factory had closed four of its 12 assembly lines because of a lack of raw materials, most of which are imported from China.“We were sent home for five days because there was nothing to do. But we got called today to start working again as the factory reopened the assembly line,” Suparman told The Jakarta Post.“I heard that there was a disruption of raw material supplies from China. That’s why we did not have any work to do, with the consequence that we were sent home for five days.”Read also: COVID-19 pandemic looms over Indonesia’s rec… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Forgot Password ? Topics : Facebook Indonesia Batam Industrial-Special-Economic-Zone electronic-products factories China raw-materials disruption COVID-19last_img read more

16-year-old among virus dead in France’s highest daily toll

first_imgThe mother of France’s youngest coronavirus victim has spoken of the “unbearable” loss of her 16-year-old daughter, as the country reported its highest daily toll from the pandemic.French authorities said on Thursday that 365 people had been killed by COVID-19 over the previous 24 hours, taking the national total of those who have died in hospital to 1,696.The figure does not include those who died from the virus at home or at retirement homes, top French health official Jerome Salomon told reporters. Her condition deteriorated and her death was announced on Thursday, with health officials emphasizing that severe cases are very rare in young people.”From the start, we were told that the virus doesn’t affect young people. We believed it, like everyone else,” Sabine said. Her daughter had no known underlying health problems. The teenage girl named Julie A died in Paris, becoming the youngest French victim of the disease that more often afflicts the elderly or people with underlying health conditions.”It’s unbearable,” the girl’s mother Sabine told AFP by phone from her home in the Parisian suburbs. “We were meant to have an ordinary life.”A week ago, Julie developed a mild cough but on Saturday she began to feel short of breath, her mother said.She underwent scans in hospital and several tests for COVID-19, the disease first detected in China late last year that has now killed more than 23,000 worldwide. Train evacuation France has been in lockdown since March 17 in a bid to slow the spread of the epidemic and officials have repeatedly warned it will take time for the measures to bear fruit.Salomon said 29,155 people had tested positive for the virus so far nationwide — adding that the real number of cases was likely far higher as testing was reserved for high-risk patients.He said 3,375 patients were currently in intensive care out of nearly 14,000 people hospitalized after becoming infected.Data showed 42,000 people had been registered by their GP as having the coronavirus over the last week alone, Salomon added — again revealing that testing in France has only revealed a minority of cases.People in the country are only allowed to step outside for pressing matters, such as shopping.”It is very difficult to estimate when the peak will come… people who are ill now were infected before the confinement began,” explained Salomon.”Now there is less contact, people are going out less and get infected less. So we hope there will be fewer people getting sick next week,” he said.French President Emmanuel Macron said he had held a “very good discussion” with his US counterpart Donald Trump about the pandemic.”In response to the COVID-19 crisis, we are preparing with other countries a new strong initiative in the coming days,” he tweeted early Friday, without elaborating.The first train evacuation saw 20 coronavirus patients moved from the country’s hard-hit east to help relieve overstretched hospitals.The specially adapted high-speed train, whose carriages were transformed into intensive care units, took the group to the western Atlantic coast where they will be treated.Another evacuation is planned for Friday, this time by air. Topics :last_img read more

Indonesia’s COVID-19 death toll tops 200 as government warns of asymptomatic transmission

first_imgTopics : “We now believe the increasing number of cases come from sources [of infection] that are difficult to detect. We have noted that some sources are people who do not show symptoms,” Yurianto said on Monday.He said asymptomatic carriers spread the virus through droplets when they talked, sneezed or coughed, but that they themselves did not notice they had contracted the disease.“The real picture of the data we have collected shows that there are still sources of infection out there with asymptomatic carriers among the public,” he noted, adding that “There are also those prone to being infected because they don’t wear face masks or wash their hands.”With the trajectory of the coronavirus outbreak not showing any signs of slowing, the government declared last week a nationwide public health emergency and implemented large-scale social restrictions aimed at curbing transmission of the virus. Indonesia’s death toll from the novel coronavirus disease topped 200 on Monday, with the government voicing particular concern about transmission from asymptomatic carriers as the number of positive cases continue to rise.Health Ministry Disease Control and Prevention Director General Achmad Yurianto said 218 new cases had been confirmed on Monday, bringing the country’s tally to 2,491 following the testing of 11,242 samples nationwide.As many as 209 people have died of the contagious disease while 192 have recovered so far.center_img Among the measures, the government has ordered people to stay at home and not to go to schools, offices, places of worship or public places.Some regions, such as Bandung in West Java, Balikpapan in East Kalimantan and Tegal in Central Java, are temporarily closing major roads and introducing curfews as rising number of cases begin to be recorded in provinces outside Java.Jakarta, the national epicenter of the outbreak, recorded on Monday 101 new cases, taking the number of confirmed cases in the city to 1,232 — more than half of the country’s overall tally.West Java, the second-hardest hit region among the country’s 32 virus-hit provinces, has reported 263 confirmed cases as of Monday, followed by East Java with 189 cases, Banten with 187 cases and Central Java with 132 cases.With many health workers also being infected, the government is working to ramp up production of personal protective equipment amid an increasing shortage.Yurianto has also called on members of the public to wear face masks when outside their homes, explaining that cloth masks would suffice to prevent transmission.”Surgical masks and N95 masks are only for health workers. We can just use masks we make on our own, no less than four hours every day, and we have to wash them with soap,” he said.last_img read more

Government mulls adding 11 new projects to national strategic list

first_imgIndonesia has been refocusing its state spending to fund the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic with a cash-strapped budget. The government has allocated Rp 405 trillion (US$25.79 billion) of funding for the pandemic budget, causing state spending to increase by nearly 3 percent to Rp 2.6 quadrillion while revenue is expected to slump by 21 percent to Rp 1.7 quadrillion.Luhut expected the privately funded projects could continue their development and absorb workers while contributing to the country’s foreign exchange reserves.A project included in the PSN list will be granted an easier licensing process and accelerated land procurement, as well as government guarantees on any political risks.Septian Hario Seto, the Office of the Coordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister’s acting deputy head for investment coordination and mining, said that two of the proposed 11 new projects were an industrial zone and an industrial park. The Obi Island Industrial Zone in South Halmahera regency, North Maluku, he said, had almost 2,000 workers and it already had a phase-two rotary kiln-electric furnace (RKEF) smelter for ferronickel production with an estimated investment of $800 million.“The significant development [in the industrial zone] will be the high-pressure acid leaching [HPAL] smelter construction, which will be completed in the third quarter of 2020,” he said, adding that the investment for the smelter was estimated at $1 billion.The HPAL smelter produces material for lithium batteries, cobalt sulfate and nickel sulfate.Septian went on to say that the second suggested project for the PSN was the Weda Bay Industrial Park project, where a smelter operation was halted due to the coronavirus outbreak. The plan for its 2020 investment was around $4 billion to $5 billion while exports were estimated to reach at least $2 billion by 2024.The other nine projects are six smelter projects, one coal-to-methane processing area in East Kalimantan, a methane industrial area and the construction of the Kediri-Tulungagung toll road in East Java.“The projects’ investors are being financially evaluated to make sure they can finish the projects by 2024 and be included in the PSN,” he said.Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto said there were currently 232 new project proposals to be included in the PSN, 84 of which were proposed by ministries, 123 projects by regional governments and 17 by state and regional-owned enterprises (BUMN/D) and eight projects by private sector investors.At the same time, the government has scrapped 10 projects from the PSN list as their estimated completion times are beyond 2024, the year when President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s second term will end. (eyc)Topics : The government has been assessing 11 new infrastructure projects to be included in the National Strategic Projects (PSN) in a bid to attract investment and create jobs.”I had a discussion with the coordinating economic minister as we want to assess which projects [in the PSN] can be funded by the private sector, so that we won’t just rely on the state budget,” Coordinating Maritime and Investment Minister Luhut Pandjaitan told a webstreamed coordination meeting on Wednesday, as quoted in the statement. His office did not elaborate on projects that might need to be scrapped.“Hopefully we can move fast given the current situation caused by the pandemic,” he said.last_img read more

COVID-19: Indonesians stranded abroad return home amid ‘mudik’ ban

first_imgThe Indonesian Embassy in Cairo said in a statement on Sunday that the special flight would also be used to repatriate around 80 Egyptian citizens who were now stranded in Bali and Jakarta back to their country.The voluntary repatriation was due to the closure of international flights in Egypt since March 19. The Indonesian Embassy and the Egyptian government agreed to provide the special flight — bound for Bali and Jakarta — and charged US$700 for each ticket.“Initially, there were 100 [Indonesian] citizens who were interested to participate in the voluntary repatriation,” said Indonesian Ambassador to Egypt Helmy Fauzy.He said the number dropped to 75 after the embassy announced that the repatriation was only for those who had urgent matters at home.   Topics : On the same day, 37 Indonesians departed Vietnam’s Tan Son Nhat International Airport in Ho Chi Minh City using Vietjet Airlines flight VJ888.They had been stranded in the country for the past month due to travel restrictions imposed by the Vietnamese government to curb the spread of COVID-19.The special flight cost $278 per seat — a discount from the normal fare of $385 — and carried Indonesian citizens who had visited Vietnam for internships, traveling as well as workers who had been laid off.The Indonesian Embassy in Bangkok, with the help of national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia, repatriated 66 Indonesians on Friday. Most of the Indonesians were embassy interns or exchange students. The embassy previously facilitated the repatriation of 356 Indonesians in Thailand following the Thai government’s decision to ban flights from April 4 to April 30.A day earlier, the Indonesian Embassy in Colombo also facilitated the repatriation of 335 Indonesian migrant workers in Sri Lanka.The embassies said the repatriations were conducted accordingly with standardized health protocols.The government has yet to issue a statement regarding the handling of the returnees upon their arrival in Jakarta or Bali, and whether they will be allowed to return to their hometown after domestic flights and other inter-provincial means of transportation were halted due to a mudik (exodus) ban that will be in place until June 1.center_img With the help of diplomatic missions abroad, dozens of Indonesian citizens have been repatriated in the past week following flight restrictions imposed in some countries because of the COVID-19 pandemic.Although the government has stated there was no policy for structured repatriation, the stranded citizens — most of whom were short-term visitors — were eager to come home at their own expense.On Sunday, at least 75 Indonesians who had been stranded in Egypt arrived in Jakarta via a special Air Cairo flight. The returnees included migrant workers, students as well as those who visited the country for training and traveling.last_img read more

Australia, New Zealand agree to work on shared travel zone

first_imgAustralia and New Zealand are committed to introducing a shared travel zone as soon as it is safe to do so, Prime Ministers Jacinda Ardern and Scott Morrison said.The two leaders agreed to commence work on a trans-Tasman COVID-safe zone that will ease travel restrictions between Australia and New Zealand, they said in a joint statement Tuesday. Earlier Ardern attended Australia’s National Cabinet meeting via video link to discuss the zone and other aspects of the fight against COVID-19.New Zealand and Australia have both had success in containing COVID-19 and avoided the exponential growth in cases seen in many other countries. As they look to relax lockdown restrictions, the focus has shifted to reigniting their economies and both would benefit if they could open the borders to each other’s tourists and business travelers. Topics : “Building on our success so far in responding to COVID-19, continuing to protect Australians and New Zealanders remains an absolute priority,” the prime ministers said. “We will remain responsive to the health situation as it develops.”The travel zone would be put in place once it is safe to do so and necessary health, transport and other protocols had been developed and met, to ensure the protection of public health, they said. Officials will work with business leaders from both nations as the plan develops.“A trans-Tasman COVID-safe travel zone would be mutually beneficial, assisting our trade and economic recovery, helping kick-start the tourism and transport sectors, enhancing sporting contacts, and reuniting families and friends,” the two leaders said. “We need to be cautious as we progress this initiative. Neither country wants to see the virus rebound so it’s essential any such travel zone is safe.”last_img read more

Italy industrial output tumbles nearly 30% in March

first_imgItaly’s industrial production tumbled nearly 30 percent in March as the country shuttered many businesses to contain the spread of the new coronavirus, the nation’s statistics agency said Monday.Production fell by 28.4 percent compared to February using seasonally adjusted figures and by 29.3 percent compared to March 2019 adjusting for the different number of working days, Istat said.Italy, home to the eurozone’s third-largest economy, has been hard-hit with almost 30,000 deaths due to the virus, with the economy shrinking 4.7 percent in the first quarter compared to a eurozone average of 3.8 percent.Italy was the first country in Europe to be hit by the pandemic, with the March industrial production figures impacted by a nationwide lockdown imposed from March 10 and all non-essential production being shut down since March 22, essentially paralysing the economy.Topics :last_img read more

22-month old baby in N. Sulawesi may be Indonesia’s youngest COVID-19 related death

first_imgAccording to the hospital spokesperson, Handry Takasenseran, besides COVID-19, the baby also suffered from tuberculosis and malnutrition.Handry said that the medical staff had tried their best to save the baby, but unfortunately his condition kept deteriorating, leading to his death on Sunday morning.“The death is most likely a result of his other conditions,” Handry said. He confirmed the death of the baby on Sunday at 8.52 a.m. local time.According to the government’s official count, North Sulawesi had 116 confirmed COVID-19 cases with seven deaths as of Monday. The province has also recorded 109 deaths of people suspected to have COVID-19. A 22-month-old baby boy who tested positive for COVID-19 has died in Manado, North Sulawesi, the province’s COVID-19 task force announced on Monday.“Case 93, a baby from Manado has died, making it a total of seven COVID-19 related deaths in North Sulawesi so far,” task force spokesperson Steaven Dandel Steaven said on Monday.Steaven added that the baby had been receiving treatment in the isolation ward at Kandou State Hospital in Manado since the beginning of May. While the elderly have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19, data from the national COVID-19 task force also showed those aged 0 to 5 years old made up 0.74 percent of the country’s COVID-19 death toll. The age group also accounts for 1.7 percent of total COVID-19 infections as of Monday.Previously, an 11-year-old girl who died at the Slamet Martodirdjo Hospital in Pamekasan in Madura Island in East Java on March 20 was confirmed as the country’s youngest COVID-19 death.When asked whether the baby boy in Manado was now the country’s youngest COVID-19 related death, Health Ministry Disease Control and Prevention Director General Achmad Yurianto told The Jakarta Post that he had not received confirmation of the case and referred the Post to the health services directorate-general.Health Services Director General Bambang Wibowo, however, did not immediately respond to the Post’s questions on the matter.Topics :last_img read more