Tag: 上海外菜会所

Jrue Holiday: New Orleans Pelicans in talks to trade veteran guard | NBA News

first_imgJrue Holiday of the New Orleans Pelicans defends against DeMar DeRozan of the San Antonio Spurs as part of the NBA Restart 2020 on August 9, 2020 at The Field House at ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Florida. Image:Jrue Holiday is considered to be one of the NBA’s elite defensive players Under new coach Stan Van Gundy, the Pelicans are expected to build around the young core of Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram. Trading Holiday could allow them to get another young player or two for the long term and also shed salary.Holiday, 30, has two years and about $52 million left on a five-year, $131.8 million deal he signed with the Pelicans in July 2017. In 61 games last season, he averaged 19.1 points, 6.7 assists and 4.8 rebounds a game – all above his career averages of 15.9 points, 6.4 assists and 3.9 rebounds. He has played 713 career games (640 starts) with the Philadelphia 76ers (2009-13) and Pelicans.- Advertisement – Want to watch even more of the NBA and WNBA but don’t have Sky Sports? Get the Sky Sports Action and Arena pack, click here. – Advertisement – Last month, he won the NBA’s 2019-20 Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year Award.Presented annually since 2012-13 and voted on by the players, the award “recognises the player deemed the best teammate based on selfless play, on-and off-court leadership as a mentor and role model to other NBA players, and commitment and dedication to (the) team,” according to a league press release.The Pelicans finished the season 30-42. Head coach Alvin Gentry was fired after the team failed to make the playoffs.- Advertisement – The New Orleans Pelicans are involved in talks to trade veteran guard Jrue Holiday, according to US reports.The Athletic said on Wednesday that “several contending teams are pursuing” Holiday in a trade.- Advertisement –last_img read more

For now, don’t count on much vaccine: Time to step up your efforts to protect your employees

first_img(CIDRAP Business Source Osterholm Briefing) – It’s a race right now! And it’s between the H1N1 virus and our long-awaited vaccine. Unfortunately, as I write this column, the virus is winning. So will your employees’ best defense against the fast-moving virus ultimately win out? Possibly. But don’t count on it.What does that mean for your organization? In short, plan on functioning without the benefit of much vaccine—and brace for more illness and rising absenteeism. And as I have discussed before, if the virus undergoes any substantial genetic change, the situation could change at any moment. Remember to keep your response proportional to the severity of disease; it’s your best strategy.The current lay of the landI’ll save a thorough analysis of the H1N1 vaccine production and distribution dilemma for another column. For now, suffice it to say the vaccine supply has been overpromised and underdelivered. But we’ve always known that a plentiful supply of effective vaccine was a big variable. No surprise there. And with the severe cutbacks in public health, school systems, and the healthcare system over the past decade, the gaps in our ability to effectively distribute the vaccine should have been apparent as well.Meanwhile, we’re seeing evidence of illness on the rise throughout most parts of the country and the Northern Hemisphere. Will the trend continue? Is this a pandemic wave about to crest? Or is this pandemic like the one in 1957 which had both fall and winter peaks? I wish I could give you an answer. I can’t, and neither can anyone else. But I can suggest that you take steps now to protect your employees to the best of your ability and with the understanding that, outside the workplace, much is outside your control.I realize that some of these steps may seem like no-brainers, others may challenge very fundamental policies, practices, and customs in your organization, and some may seem out of the realm of financial possibility. But I urge you to give each of them serious consideration if you truly want to protect your most precious asset—your employees. And I’ll offer some ideas gleaned from some savvy business leaders who attended the 2009 CIDRAP Summit.1. Insist that sick employees stay home until they are not infectiousI’m sure we’ve all been guilty at one time or another of showing up at work a little sick. Few of us would be where we are if we hadn’t pushed past a little nasal congestion or an annoying cough to meet important deadlines. But this is different.True, thus far the H1N1 pandemic for most people causes illness that is like seasonal influenza. But for some people, including some of your workforce and even essential employees, H1N1 illness can be extremely dangerous. We don’t fully understand why yet. But anyone with an influenza-like illness should not be exposing colleagues to what may be an unpredictable pandemic influenza virus, no matter how mild the symptoms may be.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people stay home until at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever (100º Fahrenheit or 38º Celsius) or signs of a fever (chills, feeling very warm, a flushed appearance, or sweating) without the use of fever-reducing medicines.You’re going to have to model this behavior yourself if you don’t want to give the impression that employees should do what they see rather than what you say.If you decide not to take this step, be sure to let everyone know that your company will not be following CDC guidance so there is no confusion, prepare for employee-relations issues, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.2. Ensure sick workers can stay home without fear of being penalizedThis is probably the hardest of the recommendations. But trust me, organizations who have adopted step 1 are figuring out how to make step 2 possible. As one human resources (HR) executive said during the summit, policies are designed to be big and broad and hard to change; however, protocols based on those policies can be flexible.Here are some of the ways organizations are tackling this step:Allowing employees to exhaust paid time off (PTO) hours and go into negative balancesAdvancing sick time up to a year of accrual (if, for example, the employee normally accrues 5 days of sick time per year and has used all 5 days, then you may want to consider advancing another 5 days)Suspending point attendance policies during the H1N1 influenza pandemicProviding a special time-off allotment for H1N1 Allowing employees to donate leave to othersFor more information on this step, please check out the 2009 CIDRAP Summit page, especially the human resources breakout presentations.If you decide not to take this step, be prepared for a form of “presenteeism” that will surely affect productivity and morale, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.3. Send sick employees home—consistentlyThe symptoms of influenza hit fast. So an employee can leave home feeling fine and arrive at work in terrible shape. And they’ll be extremely contagious at that point. I doubt they’ll be able to hide how sick they are or even want to hide it (unless they are worried about financial security). But they may not be able to get home easily. So they need to be separated from healthy employees immediately. All your supervisors need to know they are legally within their rights to send workers home and should apply the protocol consistently.By the way, this step also applies to you. Don’t try to gut it out. As someone with pandemic planning and response knowledge, you are vital to your organization, especially now. So don’t risk your own health, or anyone else’s.If you decide not to take this step, prepare for lower productivity and disruption from disgruntled employees, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.Bottom line for organizationsNo one knows if your employees will be able to get vaccinated in time to prevent becoming sick from the H1N1. No one knows if the current rise in illness is peaking or will continue to climb. So look closely at how best to protect your employees, even if the steps I’ve outlined push your organization past its comfort zone. Run a cost-benefit analysis if you need an objective measure. I think you’ll find the benefits are likely to far outweigh the risks.last_img read more

Television signal need not break the bank

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion A simple rabbit ears antenna from Walmart selling for $8.88 will pick up about 22 digital stations locally, depending on your location. It would be a smart move to keep Spectrum DVR service on one TV if you could afford it. They offer excellent service. If you have a problem, a technician will be sent free of charge to your residence.I have had direct TV and Verizon and found poor service with both. There’s also a way to get TV service without a box from Spectrum, if you have their internet service.ROBERT CONRADDuanesburgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesLocal movie theater operators react to green lightlast_img read more

Inner city

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22-month old baby in N. Sulawesi may be Indonesia’s youngest COVID-19 related death

first_imgAccording to the hospital spokesperson, Handry Takasenseran, besides COVID-19, the baby also suffered from tuberculosis and malnutrition.Handry said that the medical staff had tried their best to save the baby, but unfortunately his condition kept deteriorating, leading to his death on Sunday morning.“The death is most likely a result of his other conditions,” Handry said. He confirmed the death of the baby on Sunday at 8.52 a.m. local time.According to the government’s official count, North Sulawesi had 116 confirmed COVID-19 cases with seven deaths as of Monday. The province has also recorded 109 deaths of people suspected to have COVID-19. A 22-month-old baby boy who tested positive for COVID-19 has died in Manado, North Sulawesi, the province’s COVID-19 task force announced on Monday.“Case 93, a baby from Manado has died, making it a total of seven COVID-19 related deaths in North Sulawesi so far,” task force spokesperson Steaven Dandel Steaven said on Monday.Steaven added that the baby had been receiving treatment in the isolation ward at Kandou State Hospital in Manado since the beginning of May. While the elderly have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19, data from the national COVID-19 task force also showed those aged 0 to 5 years old made up 0.74 percent of the country’s COVID-19 death toll. The age group also accounts for 1.7 percent of total COVID-19 infections as of Monday.Previously, an 11-year-old girl who died at the Slamet Martodirdjo Hospital in Pamekasan in Madura Island in East Java on March 20 was confirmed as the country’s youngest COVID-19 death.When asked whether the baby boy in Manado was now the country’s youngest COVID-19 related death, Health Ministry Disease Control and Prevention Director General Achmad Yurianto told The Jakarta Post that he had not received confirmation of the case and referred the Post to the health services directorate-general.Health Services Director General Bambang Wibowo, however, did not immediately respond to the Post’s questions on the matter.Topics :last_img read more

ESG roundup: NBIM among $3trn investor group pushing TCFD-reporting

first_imgThe investors, who are all UNEP FI investment members, are: Addenda Capital, Aviva, Caisse de Dépôt et Placement du Québec, Desjardins Group, La Française Group, Nordea Investment Management, Norges Bank Investment Management, Rockefeller Asset Management, and Storebrand Asset Management.The UNEP FI project is not the only investor initiative on TCFD-aligned reporting. The City of London Green Finance Initiative, China Green Finance Committee and the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) have also put together a group of financial institutions, including institutional investors, to trial reporting based on the TCFD recommendations.The UNEP FI said the group would not act in isolation, citing existing investor groups and initiatives such as the Institutional Investor Group on Climate Change and the Investor Agenda.FRC: Calling all pension funds The UK’s Financial Reporting Council (FRC) wants to hear from pension funds to better understand their views on the Stewardship Code, which the public body is reviewing.Writing in a blog on the FRC’s website, its head of investor engagement Jen Sisson said the FRC wanted more asset owners to sign up to the code.“But we understand that there are competing issues that pension fund trustees need to balance, and that there is often limited time available to do so,” she added.The FRC has already outlined some of the changes it has considered making to the Stewardship Code. In the blog, Sisson said the accounting regulator wanted to know if it should provide more clarity on the expectations of those investing directly versus those investing indirectly, like many pension schemes, and if the code should more explicitly refer to environmental, social and governance factors and broader social impact.“As we move through the process of reviewing the UK Stewardship code we want to hear from you,” said Sisson.The Local Authority Pension Fund Forum (LAPFF), a £200bn (€227bn) association of UK public pension funds, has called for the FRC to be wound up and replaced with a proper statutory body.ISS takes over oekomoekom research, a Munich-based ESG research and ratings provider, has been bought by Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS), a major US provider of corporate governance and ESG products and services.oekom research will be renamed ISS-oekom and complement the work of ISS’ existing responsible investment teams, according to a statement.“As institutions across the globe continue to seek out holistic responsible investment solutions and services, ISS is pleased to respond to those demands through this transaction,” said ISS chief operating officer Stephen Harvey.The move is part of an emerging trend of consolidation among ESG/corporate governance service providers.Public pension funds turn spotlight on ‘precarious work’  The LAPFF has set out its stall on “precarious work”, publishing a report that identifies it as an investment risk and calls for changes to regulation and oversight as well as company practice.It also includes guidance for investors on how to engage with companies on issues such as zero-hours contracts, slavery, and general working conditions.Ian Greenwood and Denise Le Gal, LAPFF vice-chairs, said: “Investors can no longer turn a blind eye to precarious work. This report not only demonstrates the reputational and legal risks, it also highlights a worrying trend of companies seeing workers as a cost to be cut rather than an asset to be invested in to create long-term value.”The report can be found here.The art of manager selectionAsset owners should be clear about their expectations for the “real economy impact” of their investments when going about manager selection, according to a new guide from the PRI.Clarity on this aspect “will help to align interests for a long-term commercial relationship,” it said.The PRI has been promoting more and better integration of ESG-related issues in manager selection for some time. It said its new guide provided more detail on what ESG-related issues asset owners needed to think about when looking to select an investment manager.The PRI said: “Among others, this new document makes a fundamental point around manager selection: If there is no cultural fit and understanding of ESG factors between an asset owner and a potential manager, there is little [foundation] to establish a long-term investment relationship.”The guide can be found here. A near-$3trn (€2trn) group of investors – including Norway’s giant sovereign wealth fund – has formed to promote action on climate reporting by the investor community.Together with the UN Environment Finance Initiative (UNEP FI), nine investors will work towards providing a first set of information in line with the recommendations of the Financial Stability Board Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD).“The outputs and conclusions of the group will encourage and ease the adoption of the TCFD’s recommendations by the wider industry,” UNEP FI said in a statement.A report on the pilot project is expected to be published by the end of 2018.last_img read more