Tag: 夜上海论坛QI

For now, don’t count on much vaccine: Time to step up your efforts to protect your employees

first_img(CIDRAP Business Source Osterholm Briefing) – It’s a race right now! And it’s between the H1N1 virus and our long-awaited vaccine. Unfortunately, as I write this column, the virus is winning. So will your employees’ best defense against the fast-moving virus ultimately win out? Possibly. But don’t count on it.What does that mean for your organization? In short, plan on functioning without the benefit of much vaccine—and brace for more illness and rising absenteeism. And as I have discussed before, if the virus undergoes any substantial genetic change, the situation could change at any moment. Remember to keep your response proportional to the severity of disease; it’s your best strategy.The current lay of the landI’ll save a thorough analysis of the H1N1 vaccine production and distribution dilemma for another column. For now, suffice it to say the vaccine supply has been overpromised and underdelivered. But we’ve always known that a plentiful supply of effective vaccine was a big variable. No surprise there. And with the severe cutbacks in public health, school systems, and the healthcare system over the past decade, the gaps in our ability to effectively distribute the vaccine should have been apparent as well.Meanwhile, we’re seeing evidence of illness on the rise throughout most parts of the country and the Northern Hemisphere. Will the trend continue? Is this a pandemic wave about to crest? Or is this pandemic like the one in 1957 which had both fall and winter peaks? I wish I could give you an answer. I can’t, and neither can anyone else. But I can suggest that you take steps now to protect your employees to the best of your ability and with the understanding that, outside the workplace, much is outside your control.I realize that some of these steps may seem like no-brainers, others may challenge very fundamental policies, practices, and customs in your organization, and some may seem out of the realm of financial possibility. But I urge you to give each of them serious consideration if you truly want to protect your most precious asset—your employees. And I’ll offer some ideas gleaned from some savvy business leaders who attended the 2009 CIDRAP Summit.1. Insist that sick employees stay home until they are not infectiousI’m sure we’ve all been guilty at one time or another of showing up at work a little sick. Few of us would be where we are if we hadn’t pushed past a little nasal congestion or an annoying cough to meet important deadlines. But this is different.True, thus far the H1N1 pandemic for most people causes illness that is like seasonal influenza. But for some people, including some of your workforce and even essential employees, H1N1 illness can be extremely dangerous. We don’t fully understand why yet. But anyone with an influenza-like illness should not be exposing colleagues to what may be an unpredictable pandemic influenza virus, no matter how mild the symptoms may be.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people stay home until at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever (100º Fahrenheit or 38º Celsius) or signs of a fever (chills, feeling very warm, a flushed appearance, or sweating) without the use of fever-reducing medicines.You’re going to have to model this behavior yourself if you don’t want to give the impression that employees should do what they see rather than what you say.If you decide not to take this step, be sure to let everyone know that your company will not be following CDC guidance so there is no confusion, prepare for employee-relations issues, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.2. Ensure sick workers can stay home without fear of being penalizedThis is probably the hardest of the recommendations. But trust me, organizations who have adopted step 1 are figuring out how to make step 2 possible. As one human resources (HR) executive said during the summit, policies are designed to be big and broad and hard to change; however, protocols based on those policies can be flexible.Here are some of the ways organizations are tackling this step:Allowing employees to exhaust paid time off (PTO) hours and go into negative balancesAdvancing sick time up to a year of accrual (if, for example, the employee normally accrues 5 days of sick time per year and has used all 5 days, then you may want to consider advancing another 5 days)Suspending point attendance policies during the H1N1 influenza pandemicProviding a special time-off allotment for H1N1 Allowing employees to donate leave to othersFor more information on this step, please check out the 2009 CIDRAP Summit page, especially the human resources breakout presentations.If you decide not to take this step, be prepared for a form of “presenteeism” that will surely affect productivity and morale, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.3. Send sick employees home—consistentlyThe symptoms of influenza hit fast. So an employee can leave home feeling fine and arrive at work in terrible shape. And they’ll be extremely contagious at that point. I doubt they’ll be able to hide how sick they are or even want to hide it (unless they are worried about financial security). But they may not be able to get home easily. So they need to be separated from healthy employees immediately. All your supervisors need to know they are legally within their rights to send workers home and should apply the protocol consistently.By the way, this step also applies to you. Don’t try to gut it out. As someone with pandemic planning and response knowledge, you are vital to your organization, especially now. So don’t risk your own health, or anyone else’s.If you decide not to take this step, prepare for lower productivity and disruption from disgruntled employees, and know that a consequence may well be greater absenteeism than you expected.Bottom line for organizationsNo one knows if your employees will be able to get vaccinated in time to prevent becoming sick from the H1N1. No one knows if the current rise in illness is peaking or will continue to climb. So look closely at how best to protect your employees, even if the steps I’ve outlined push your organization past its comfort zone. Run a cost-benefit analysis if you need an objective measure. I think you’ll find the benefits are likely to far outweigh the risks.last_img read more

Paco Jémez: “I haven’t talked to the president for three months”

first_imgLaBiga SmartBank* Data updated as of February 1, 2020 The market“If we didn’t have tomorrow’s game, I could talk about the market. It’s not worth it. The important thing is not what happened. I try not to worry. I want everyone to assume their responsibility. I think it would be a mistake to divert attention to the market. What the club has done in winter is your problem. “The lack of midfielders“We will try to fix it as we can. We still have people and it is a place where we can have more combinations. All our extremes could play half-point. There are if we have more possibilities, although with the injuries of Santi Comesaña and Jorge Pozo. Find a solution for a extreme is already more difficult. I worry less as soon as we lose more players in the midfield. “The rise“When it comes to setting the goals, you have to be very responsible. It is true that from the beginning we have suffered many casualties and others, such as Embarba or Alex Moreno, have left. We have acquired some players and surely no one will leave saying that objective is different, I now focus more on the good feelings that the team is giving, I still think that with this group it is worth believing it, if I would not believe it, I would have resigned We continue going forward, we still think that we are a great team, a great group. I have to recognize that I like to work in a different way and do many things more cautiously and in a more sensible way. I think we can fight to ascend. “Competitiveness in Second (in relation to the low of Cádiz and Fuenlabrada)“You have to be very cautious when handling the objectives. It is very difficult that in such a long season there is no downturn in each team. I think we have made a very good January. We can look forward to the future with optimism, but very cautiously, we don’t have to lose our conviction in your people, I think we are convinced that we have a template to get into the promotion positions, nobody is going to be promoted here, look at the Depor, he won five consecutive victories, something that the first have not done. “Low“We have Miguel Morro with discomfort. For the rest nothing new.” Rayo has six games in Second without losing, but against Mirandés he wants to win again after adding two consecutive draws against Ponferradina and Extremadura. The Franjirrojos closed the market with the arrival of Yacine Qasmi, which will compete to win the position to Ulloa, and with the Lass farewell, which goes to Lugo and Piovaccari, who returns to Cordova. Nevertheless, Paco Jémez refused to answer questions about the market and was annoyed by the work of the board in this issue: “You have to call the president, sit him here and ask him these questions. I have not talked to him for three months”, said. Here, the rest of the press conference:Mirandés“It is a team that plays with intensity and takes good advantage of its virtues in a very heavy field. You have to play very well with them and you have to match them in intensity and enthusiasm in the desire to win. This week on all we have tried is that the people focus on the importance of getting all three points. “center_img The physical state of the equipment“He has recovered well. Losing a Cup qualifier as we lost it does not hurt you but quite the opposite. We won in many things. We have made a great Cup competition and in that aspect we have come out reinforced. Physically we have recovered and in principle we have done a fantastic workout. “last_img read more