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Update on the latest sports

first_imgThe league also is looking at other rules changes, including an alternative to the onside kick.NFL clubs received a list of potential rules changes on Thursday. Owners will vote on the proposals at the upcoming league meeting to be held by video conference on May 28.The league’s competition committee told teams last month it supports studying ways to determine how officiating personnel who have access to a video feed could help on-field officials. A booth umpire would serve as an eighth game official. If owners don’t approve adding a booth umpire and/or a senior technology adviser, the league could test a version of both rules in the preseason for possible future implementation.The proposal that would give teams another option instead of an onside kick permits a team to maintain possession of the ball after a score by substituting one offensive play. The kicking team would attempt a fourth-and-15 from its 25-yard line. This could be done a maximum of two times per game. Onside kicks have become infrequent — and rarely successful — since the NFL changed rules on alignments for kickoffs.In other NFL news: Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditNFL-NEWSNFL looks at adding “booth umpire” and tech adviser for refsUNDATED (AP) — The NFL is considering adding a “booth umpire” and a senior technology adviser to the referee to assist the officiating crew. Update on the latest sports — IndyCar has made more revisions to its schedule. The open-wheel series has canceled the June 27 race in Richmond, Virginia, and the street course race in Toronto on July 12. IndyCar is slated to finally begin June 6 at Texas Motor Speedway but will not race after Texas until an event July 4 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The race scheduled for June 21 at Road America in Wisconsin has been changed to a doubleheader there on July 11-12. The season finale had already been changed to Oct. 25 on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida, which was scheduled as the season opener before the series was suspended March 13.— Golf Digest is reporting the European Tour hopes to resume its season in England the first weekend in August as part of a four-tournament “bubble” in the UK. The magazine cited sources as saying the British Masters would be followed by two tournaments in England and one in Wales at Celtic Manor for 1 million euros ($1.1 million) in prize money. The European Tour has postponed nine tournaments and canceled eight others on its schedule because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In a memo, the European Tour says priority rankings will stay the same for 2021 and there will not be Q-school.— Some Louisville football and basketball players will return to campus Wednesday in a phased approach and begin voluntary workouts in early June. The first phase of 30 football players and 15 men’s and women’s basketball players will arrive next week after being instructed on safety protocols. Testing and physicals will begin June 3, with voluntary training not directed by coaching staffs to begin five days later. Training will take place at three facilities with limited capacity. Pending additional direction from the NCAA, Louisville can include up to 15 swimming and diving athletes in the phase and open its natatorium with limited capacity. — East Carolina University is eliminating its men’s and women’s tennis and swimming and diving programs to help reduce a $4.9 million budget deficit. The move affects 68 student-athletes and nine coaches and reduces ECU’s sponsored sports from 20 to 16, including nine for women. The NCAA requires Division I FBS schools to carry minimums of 16 sports, eight for women.— Little League is offering youth baseball organizations a pathway forward as they eye a restart amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The organization has released a set of “best practice” guidelines it believes would allow baseball and softball to be played safely after local authorities give the groups the all-clear to return to play. The recommendations include eliminating all non-essential contact and banning the postgame handshake line in favor of lining up along the respective baselines and tipping your cap to the opponent. All players should wear masks while in the dugout and coaches and volunteers should wear masks and protective medical gloves at all times. — An NFL player is suing United Airlines, saying he was harassed and sexually assaulted by an intoxicated female passenger on a red-eye flight in February. The player said in a lawsuit that soon after boarding the cross-country flight, a woman sitting in the same row confronted him over a face mask that he was wearing as protection against the coronavirus. The player says the woman confronted him over his face mask, ripped off the mask and groped him. The NFL player and a companion who joined the lawsuit were not named. United confirms there was some sort of incident and a passenger was moved to a different seat, but says it won’t comment further.— Tom Brady’s journey to each of his nine Super Bowls with the New England Patriots will be the subject of an ESPN series released in 2021. Titled “The Man in the Arena: Tom Brady,” the nine-episode series will include a look from Brady’s perspective at the six NFL titles and three Super Bowl defeats he was a part of. It should be a rare opportunity for up-close revelations from the usually private quarterback who left New England this year after 20 seasons and is now with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The series will be produced by ESPN, 199 Productions, which is Brady’s production company, and Gotham Chopra of Religion of Sports.MLB-NEWSCubs institute pay cuts, Pirates announce furloughsUNDATED (AP) — The Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates are trimming payroll while they await word on the fate of the Major League Baseball season. The Cubs are instituting pay cuts because of the coronavirus crisis, but there will be no furloughs through the end of June. The Pirates announced Thursday they are instituting furloughs for several employees in business operations beginning on June 1.Chicago’s cuts were based on compensation, according to a person with direct knowledge of the situation. The person told The Associated Press that 80% of associates are taking a pay cut of 20% or less, and that president of baseball operations Theo Epstein and president of business operations Crane Kenney took the highest reductions.In other MLB news:— Tampa Bay Rays pitching prospect Brent Honeywell has had a decompression procedure on his right ulnar nerve and is set to begin strength and mobility exercises. Honeywell, who hasn’t pitched in the minors since September 2017, is scheduled to start exercises on Monday at the Rays’ spring training complex in Port Charlotte. Honeywell was among Tampa Bay’s top prospects after going 13-9 with a 3.49 ERA in 26 starts for Double-A Montgomery and Triple-A Durham in 2017. He missed the following season after Tommy John surgery during spring training. He sat out 2019 after an operation last June to repair a right elbow fracture.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS VANDERBILT-ATHLETIC DIRECTORVanderbilt’s Lee becomes 1st black woman AD in SECNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Vanderbilt has removed the interim title and made Candice Storey Lee the first woman to run a Southeastern Conference athletics program.Lee is one of only five women and the second black woman in charge of a Power Five program. Daniel Diermeier, who takes over as Vanderbilt’s chancellor on July 1, said Lee is the “living embodiment” of the university’s values and aspirations.The 41-year-old Lee is a former Commodores basketball captain. She took over as interim athletic director on Feb. 4 when Malcolm Turner resigned after one year on the job.center_img Boxing aims for June 9 return in Las VegasUNDATED (AP) — Add boxing to the list of sports on the comeback trail. Promoter Bob Arum says he plans to stage a card of five fights on June 9 at the MGM Grand, the first of a series of fights over the next two months at the Las Vegas hotel. A second fight card will be held two nights later, kicking off twice weekly shows at the hotel in June and July.No fans will be allowed, and Arum said fighters and everyone else will be tested at least twice during fight week for the new coronavirus. The fights are pending approval of the Nevada Athletic Commission, which meets next week to consider the events along with two cards that UFC plans to stage at its facility in Las Vegas. They are also pending the reopening of the MGM and other Las Vegas hotels.In other developments related to the coronavirus pandemic:— The return of Xfinity Series racing has been delayed once again by rain at Darlington Raceway. It’s the first race for the series since March 7 due to the coronvirus pandemic. It was originally set for Tuesday night, but heavy storms washed out that plan. Organizers were set to try again Thursday at noon but that, too, had to be put on hold because of rain at the old, country track. The NASCAR Cup Series had a successful return at Darlington with two races this week. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS-BRIBERYLoughlin, Giannulli to serve prison time for college scamBOSTON (AP) — Court papers show actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, have agreed to plead guilty to charges that will include prison time in the college admissions bribery case.Loughlin has agreed to serve two months behind bars and Giannulli has agreed to serve five months under the deal, which must be approved by the judge. They will plead guilty to conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud. Prosecutors agreed to dismiss charges of money laundering and federal programs bribery that were added after the case was filed. An attorney for the couple declined to comment.Loughlin and Giannulli were accused of paying $500,000 in bribes to get their daughters into the University of Southern California as crew team recruits.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 — Horse racing’s National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame has canceled its induction ceremony in August because of health and safety concerns related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Hall of Fame president John Hendrickson says the museum believes it’s “in the best interests of everyone involved and for the integrity of the event to postpone the ceremony for a year.” The Hall of Fame ceremony was scheduled for Friday, Aug. 7. This year’s class includes trainer Mark Casse, jockey Darrel McHargue, horses Wise Dan and Tom Bowling, and Pillars of the Turf Alice Headley Chandler, Keene Daingerfield, Jr., and George D. Widener, Jr. They will be inducted with next year’s class. The 44th Annual Museum Ball scheduled for Aug. 14 also was canceled. It’s traditionally one of the highlights of the Saratoga summer social season.— Tokyo Olympic organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto spoke Thursday about the need to take “countermeasures” to combat the coronavirus at next year’s postponed games. Muto acknowledged in an online news conference that “there are some in Japan” talking about holding the games without fans. Muto did not say this was going to happen. He was responding to comments in a BBC interview in which International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said an Olympics without fans “is not what we want.” But Bach did not rule it out, and said any such a decision would take more time.— The governing body of swimming has postponed the short course world championships for a year because of the coronavirus pandemic. FINA (FEE’-nuh) says the championships scheduled for December in Abu Dhabi will now be staged Dec. 13-18, 2021, in the United Arab Emirates because of the “the uncertainty related with the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide.” FINA’s president says swimming organizers have worked closely with the United Arab Emirates’ authorities and “we believe this is the most suitable solution for all those taking part in this competition.”— German soccer club Dynamo Dresden has reported another case of coronavirus. The already quarantined second-division club has now had four players test positive. Dresden says on its website that the latest positive result was found in a fifth wave of tests conducted on Wednesday. It adds that another “category one” close contact of its coaching staff has also tested positive for COVID-19. The player, staff member and staff member’s contact person must now go into quarantine at home for 14 days. Dresden’s entire team was ordered by local health authorities into 14 days of quarantine on May 9 after two players tested positive. The club says that all players who tested positive before were cleared in the fourth and fifth wave of tests and that they and the rest of the team will be able to resume training on Saturday.— English soccer club Manchester United says it believes it will miss out on $24 million because the Premier League will have to make refunds to broadcasters even if the pandemic-disrupted season is completed. The league is in talks with its rights holders about rebates because of delays and changes to the broadcasting schedule. The season was suspended in March. Empty stadiums will also change the TV product. The rebates will vary based on the final position in the standings and the number of games aired live. United is in fifth place with nine games remaining. The Premier League hasn’t provided details of the broadcasting rebate. May 21, 2020 Associated Press last_img read more

Pop first-years shine at showcase

first_imgThis semester’s first-year students were shepherded by Andy Abad and Patrice Rushen, two GRAMMY-nominated professionals and professors of popular music performance in USC Thornton. There was no shortage of good words for them among the students. At the intermission, Abad thanked his young performers for their hard work and sang their praises, informing the audience that they were witnessing “the future of pop music.”  It was easy to see that the thrill of performance was at the forefront of each performers’ mind space. Many of the performers did not face any anxiety before their sets. While she may find herself a bit nervous offstage in “party settings,” Balady noted that she doesn’t suffer from any pre-performance jitters.  Mariah Quintero, a first-year pop music student, performs with cohort at Tommy’s Place on Wednesday night. (Lindsey Yu | Daily Trojan) “Performing is very much a mental thing,” Morcote said. “You just have to get in the mindset and have fun with it.” The night opened with an electric rendition of Sam & Dave’s “Hold On, I’m Comin’,” led by Quintero, a junior majoring in psychology who is entering her first year in the popular music program. Her magnetic stage presence and natural chemistry with her band set the tone for the night; it was clear from the start that this cohort wasn’t lacking in spirit nor talent. One performer, Tippy Balady, asked the audience for a little “Respect” before launching into a soulful rendition of Aretha’s finest. Song selection ranged from fast-tempo, high energy numbers, such as Amii Stewart’s “Knock On Wood,” to more reflective and romantic tracks, such as Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay.” The student performers had no trouble adjusting to the range of moods, finding their emotional base and engaging with whatever feelings the song demanded. Whether that called for sky-high ecstasy or subtle melancholy, they were tapped in. This proved to be a universal feeling among listeners, as many of the audience members found themselves standing up and dancing along to the soulful renditions of some of their favorite ’70s hits. It was very much a concert environment, and it would’ve been difficult not to crack a smile and bust a move while watching such a charming and lively group of young professionals. The Thornton School of Music’s first-year popular music students assembled at Tommy’s Place Wednesday for their first showcase. At the event, which was also their midterm, students divided into four bands to perform a set of ’70s Motown classics. Though their “first-year” label might imply inexperience, these students occupied the stage with uninhibited confidence, ready to put on a show. The performers’ sense of enjoyment was intoxicating. Their energy was infectious and lit up the basement at Tommy’s. For keyboardist Isabella Morcote, a freshman majoring in songwriting and popular music performance, getting in the right headspace was paramount.  From the start of the night it was clear that this cohort — which welcomed themselves with a show-circle and group cheer — was a close one. Sam Bellavance, a freshman popular music major and bassist at Thursday night’s performance, recalls being extremely nervous for the first midterm in the fall, as he was unsure what to expect. But as time passed and the group became more comfortable, all nerves melted away.  “It’s no ego, all love,” Quintero said. “This group really supports each other. We take each other to places we never would’ve imagined.” Throughout the night, there was no end to the adoration and gratitude the students felt toward Thornton’s faculty; it was clear they were all thankful to have a team of such encouraging and professional mentors.  “The cohort becomes super tight within the first semester,” Bellavance said. “I love all of them, and I’ve been working gigs with some of the other singers too.” As she took the stage blinded by blue light and surrounded by an imposing crowd, Mariah Quintero was not one for nerves. She had put in the work and was ready to let that speak for itself. For her and her peers, that work spoke volumes. “Support” was the word of the night, as there was a tangible feeling of encouragement throughout the room. When the final performance of The Jackson 5’s “I Want You Back” began, much of the room stood to sing and dance along with them. As singer-songwriter Cordelia Degher, a freshman majoring in popular musical performance, belted the final note and the night’s journey came to an end, it felt like a triumph for the entire cohort. “I wasn’t nervous at all,” said Balady, a freshman majoring in songwriting. “I was more excited to perform and do my craft. On stage, it’s me being my truest self.” “Everyone is actually really encouraging,” Balady said. “A lot of people think that it’s a high stakes, high pressure situation, but … everyone’s really there to support and we all learn from each other.”  This sentiment was echoed by freshman popular music student and bassist Austin Brown, who appreciated how quickly the group had transitioned from cohort to community.  “We’re really just kind of like a family,” Brown said. Throughout the semester, students were given three songs each week to perform and master for class. Of these, four songs were selected for the final showcase. As the showcase was a midterm, some of the songs were repeated between the bands, but they never felt stale. Each group brought their own personal flair and artistic choice to the songs; some opted for more contemporary vocals, while others adhered more toward the gospel-influences of the original Motown artists. Though each group’s arrangement varied in approach, there was a consistent energy throughout the show that unified the four bands. While their classmates performed, other members of the cohort shouted cheers of encouragement and even took to the floor to dance along to their friends’ performances.  “The faculty is unparalleled,” Quintero said. “They give us such individualized attention and want to see us grow.”  Throughout the department, encouragement and enthusiasm were abound among students to staff.last_img read more