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SENSATIONAL LINE-UP FOR ST PATRICK’S WEEK AT THE CAVERN

first_imgThe Cavern Bar, Letterkennys No1 Sports Bar & Party Venue, is gearing up for another massive week with a full line up of entertainment and sports this St Patrick’s Day.Tonight (Tuesday)  DJs Chris Mac & Danny G will be providing the entertainment for the Official LYIT Student Pre-Paddys Party Night with some unbeatable drinks promotions at the Bar! Wednesday nights its St Patricks Day Eve with the popular and entertaining DJ Scoop back with a special edition of his weekly midweek party night at the CavernIt’s all systems go on Thursday with a full day of entertainment lined up, DJ Scoop with be playing from 3-6pm following the annual St Patrick’s Day parade, followed by DJ’s Chris Mac & Danny G from 6-9pm and later it’s the popular DJ Joe Deckz providing the entertainment into the early hours.On Friday it’s the legendary DJ Marty McIntyre playing all your favourite Party hits from 10pm with great drinks promotions at the bar.Popular radio presenter and entertainer Marty Friel will be back this Saturday night with his Saturday Night Jumpin’ Jukebox. Champagne giveaways for hens and party’s on the night. Finish off the week at Letterkennys No1 Sunday Night Bar with DJ Joe Deckz with the great value Sunday drinks menu at the bar.Sports will be shown daily on our 18 HD Screens with an unrivalled choice of matches to choose from. Man Utd v Liverpool will be live on St Patricks Day with complementary finger food at half time.For more information and details check out the Cavern Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ cavernletterkenny/SENSATIONAL LINE-UP FOR ST PATRICK’S WEEK AT THE CAVERN was last modified: March 15th, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:EntertainmentLYITPre-PartySt Patrick’s DaystudentThe Cavern Barlast_img read more

KILKENNY PLAYERS TOLD TO KEEP THEIR HANDS OFF JIMMY!

first_imgFirst it was RTE who gave us just a few minutes on the Late Late.Now the All-Ireland winning hurling champions Kilkenny have tried to hijack our unofficial anthem.Kilkenny captain Eoin Larkin climbed the steps of Croke Park today after brushing aside Galway in the All-Ireland hurling final replay to heist the Liam McCarthy Cup. But Larkin shocked fans when he sang a rather strange version of Rory Gallagher’s song Jimmy’s Winning Matches to the words of ‘Cody’s Winning Matches’ in honour of manager Brian Cody.Social network sites have been swamped with calls for Larkin to keep his hands off our song.Now if only Donegal could repeat the dominance Kilkenny has enjoyed over the years!KILKENNY PLAYERS TOLD TO KEEP THEIR HANDS OFF JIMMY! was last modified: September 30th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Warriors’ reaction to Andrew Bogut’s standing ovation

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – Well before he even stepped on the court, Andrew Bogut received the loudest ovation of the night.The reason: the Warriors played a tribute video capturing Bogut’s previous four-year stop (2012-2016) that coincided with the team’s first NBA title in 40 years (2015) and a record-setting regular-season (2015-16).It only seemed fitting the Warriors would …last_img read more

‘Congress culture of keeping alive dissidence not dead’

first_imgAs the suspense continues over Congress leader Navjot Singh Sidhu taking charge of his new Ministry amid the ongoing tussle with Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh, the rift between the two leaders seems to be growing wider with the former cricketer visiting New Delhi to meet Congress president Rahul Gandhi.As part of the post-poll Cabinet reshuffle last week, Capt. Amarinder divested Mr. Sidhu of the key Local Government portfolio and allocated him Power and New and Renewable Energy Sources.Mr. Sidhu, who met Mr. Gandhi, Congress general secretary Priyanka Gandhi Vadra and veteran leader Ahmed Patel on Monday, is learnt to have apprised the “high command” of being “singled out unfairly” in the Cabinet rejig on the pretext of the party’s “poor performance” in urban areas of the State in the general election.Mr. Gandhi’s meeting with Mr. Sidhu has drawn criticism from political analysts. “Mr. Sidhu’s audience with the high command hints that Congress’s culture of keeping alive dissidence at the State level against the State leadership is not dead,” said Ashutosh Kumar, professor of political science at Panjab University. “Capt. Amarinder, after the Assembly and Lok Sabha polls, has emerged as a strong leader and, on the other hand, the Congress high command looks weak after its performance in the Lok Sabha polls,” he said. “Any effort to push for reinstatement of Mr. Sidhu as the Local Government Minister in an attempt to resolve the ongoing tussle in the State unit risks undermining the Chief Minister’s authority and further worsening the rift within the party in Punjab,” he added.Cong. downplays riftThe State Congress, however, downplayed the significance of Mr. Sidhu’s meeting, with Asha Kumari, the AICC in-charge of Punjab affairs, asserting that every Congressman was “entitled” to meet the party president. “As far as his [Mr. Sidhu’s] taking charge of the new portfolio is concerned, if Mr. Sidhu does not desire, it’s entirely his wish. He [Mr. Sidhu] is a Minister of Capt. Amarinder’s Cabinet and it’s for the Chief Minister to decide who will hold which portfolio,” she said.Ronki Ram, Dean at the Department of Social Science at Panjab University, said Mr. Sidhu’s meeting with the party’s central leadership appeared like an attempt at capturing a “power stronghold”. “If the CM has to take decision on the dictation of the party high command, it’s not in good taste. This shows the party is highly centralised,” he said.The two Punjab leaders have been at loggerheads in recent months with Mr. Sidhu’s wife Navjot Kaur Sidhu accusing Capt. Amarinder of blocking her Lok Sabha candidacy from Chandigarh. Later, the Chief Minister had claimed that “Sidhu’s remarks ahead of polling” had affected the party’s performance. He had also blamed Mr. Sidhu’s “poor handling” of the key local bodies portfolio as a factor for the Congress’s “poor performance” in urban areas. Mr. Sidhu had retorted by asserting that he was being “singled out publicly” even though the urban areas had played a critical role in the party’s victory in the Lok Sabha polls. The Congress won eight of the 13 seats it contested, improving on its 2014 tally of just three.last_img read more

Serena on banned umpire Ramos I dont know who that is

first_imgNew York: Serena Williams is trying hard to move past last year’s US Open final meltdown, preferring to forget the umpire she called a “liar” and “thief” and fans booing a controversial ending. Williams humbled Russia’s Maria Sharapova 6-1, 6-1 on Monday to reach the second round of the US Open as she seeks a historic seventh New York title and 24th Grand Slam singles crown. Asked if she felt the tournament was hers to win, the eighth seed replied, “I feel like I’m here to do that. We’ll see what happens.” Her domination of Sharapova produced a 19th consecutive triumph over the five-time Slam winner, boosting her record in the rivalry to 20-2. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh It was the first match for Williams at Ashe since she unleashed her wrath at umpire Carlos Ramos in last year’s US Open final and he awarded a game penalty to eventual winner Naomi Osaka of Japan, this year’s top seed and the reigning Australian Open champion as well. The US Tennis Association decided before the start that Ramos will not officiate any Serena or Venus Williams match at this year’s US Open. When she was asked about Ramos, whose penalty calls had a major impact in her loss to Osaka, she replied, “I don’t know who that is.” It’s doubtful she will want to jog her memory by looking at video of last year’s final, which ended with Williams in tears and Osaka’s moment of glory left “bittersweet” as fans voiced displeasure at the controversial awarding of a game that put Osaka one game from the title. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later Williams, when asked about how much last year’s final entered her mind in her return to Ashe, spoke only about the crowd that was loud and vocal in supporting her over Sharapova. “It was great. The fans, they were so amazing,” Williams said. “I could hear them walking down the hallway. It was such a good feeling. It made me feel unbelievable, really helped me get amped up and pumped up.” She thanked the fans on the court after the match with a nod to past defeats, saying, “I’ve had a lot of tough matches and a lot of tough losses but coming out here tonight makes it all worthwhile.” A celebrity-filled crowd watched her dismantle Sharapova. “Her game really matches up well against mine,” Williams said. “Her ball somehow lands in my strike zone. It’s just perfect for me. “I was able to zone in, especially down breakpoints, not letting her in the match. She’s the kind of player that keeps going. Even towards the end, she just wants to keep fighting.” And as if US wildcard Caty McNally, her next foe, or any other rival needed any more concern, Williams warned she has some new, unrevealed aspects to her game to bring out should the need arise. “I’ve been working on a lot of new things,” she said. “I don’t really talk about what I’ve been working on so much. I definitely have been working on a lot of new stuff to incorporate in my game.”last_img read more

Cara Delevingne defends Ashley Benson over homophobic trolls

first_imgPictured: Model Cara Delevingne presents a creation during the annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show in New York, November 13, 2013.ReutersYou go girls. Ashley Benson and Cara Delevingne reportedly tag-teamed to shut down two prejudiced users on Instagram, who tried to encourage Ashley to leave her rumored girlfriend.Cara Delevingne and Ashley Benson have been together since last year, but neither has outrightly confirmed that they are dating. But Cara’s fierce defence of her”true love” does speak volumes about their relationship status. The pair faced down Instagram trolls in an epic way. The trolls insinuated that Ashley Benson was being treated badly and that she deserves better while others had a problem with the homosexual nature of their relationship.Ashley Benson responded by saying, “You need to mind your own business. Stop making things up.” When the Pretty Little Liars star replied, Cara swooped in with even more to say. Victoria’s Secret Angel, Cara Delevingne would not let haters and trolls gang up on her rumoured girlfriend. “You are f***ing disgusting! If you have a problem with true love then come and say this s**t to my face instead pathetically hating through Instagram,” Cara replied, tagging the trolls.  Cara Delevingne and Ashley BensonFelix Radford InstagramCara Delevingne and Ashley Benson have kept their relationship pretty much on the low, except for a few moments of PDA here and there, including a public butt grab. The passionate defence of their relationship seems to prove that the pair is in love.Over the weekend, the pair celebrated the release of their new movie Her Smell.It is known that Ashley Benson shot to fame with her role as Hanna Marin in the teen mystery-drama television series Pretty Little Liars from 2010 to 2017, while British-born Cara Delevingne reportedly hit the modelling scene running at the young age of 17 in 2009 and went on to win the Model Of The Year award at the British Fashion Awards in 2012 and 2014.last_img read more

How a SolarHydrogen Economy Could Supply the Worlds Energy Needs

first_imgWind: Abbott explains that wind actually comes from the sun (since the sun heats the ground creating massive convection currents, meaning that wind is a diluted form of solar power), although he shows that wind power is economically uncompetitive with solar power in all locations except cold regions with poor sun levels. Further, a typical 1.5-MW wind turbine requires 20 gallons of lubricating oil every 5 years, which would become unsustainable in a few decades. Why a hydrogen economy doesn’t make sense Explore further Citation: How a Solar-Hydrogen Economy Could Supply the World’s Energy Needs (2009, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-08-solar-hydrogen-economy-world-energy.html Unlike many other current hydrogen-powered vehicles, the BMW Hydrogen 7 directly ignites the hydrogen in its internal combustion engine. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons. Work by User: Mattes. (PhysOrg.com) — As the world’s oil supply continues to dry out every day, the question of what will replace oil and other fossil fuels is becoming more and more urgent. According to the World Coal Institute, at the present rate of consumption, coal will run out in 130 years, natural gas in 60 years, and oil in 42 years. Around the world, researchers are investigating alternative energy technologies with encouraging progress – but the question still remains: which source(s) will prove to be most efficient and sustainable in 30, 50, or 100 years from now? Despite the advantages, hydrogen fuel technology still faces challenges. For instance, the electrodes used in water electrolysis are currently coated with platinum, which is not a sustainable resource, and researchers are currently investigating other materials. Other issues include transporting hydrogen – a recent study has shown that it is more economical to deliver hydrogen by truck to refueling stations rather than perform on-site electrolysis. Another hurdle is storage – in terms of sustainability, Abbott suggests that the most straightforward approach is to liquefy the hydrogen. Although liquefying hydrogen requires an additional energy cost, Abbott argues that the scenario should not be mistaken for a zero-sum game as is the case with fossil fuels. Since the sun supplies a virtually unlimited amount of energy, the solution is to factor in the non-recurring cost of extra solar collectors to provide the energy for liquefaction. His calculations show that the cost of a solar collector farm used to produce hydrogen is still lower than a nuclear station of equivalent power.Overall, Abbott’s message is that there exists a single technology that can supply the world’s energy needs in a clean, sustainable way: solar-hydrogen. The difference in his approach compared to other analyses, he explains, is his long-term perspective. While nuclear power is often cited to be the economically favorable technology in the short-term, Abbott argues that the long-term return on nuclear power is virtually zero due to its limited lifetime, while solar-hydrogen power can theoretically last us the next one billion years. “The biggest challenge is escaping from the economic effects of vendor lock-in where large investments in nuclear and traditional energy sources keep us ‘locked-in’ to feeding monsters that will bring us down an economic black hole,” Abbott said. “It’s rather like the play The Little Shop of Horrors where a man-eating plant is initially fed small amounts, but then its voracious appetite sends it into a downward spiral swallowing up anyone that gets in its way.”Of course, Abbott’s analysis is just one approach in the ongoing debate on the advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen. Among several reviews published in a special issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE in October 2006 is an analysis by Ulf Bossel, which shows that a hydrogen economy is uncompetitive due to the energy costs of storage, transportation, etc. Abbott agrees that hydrogen is not an efficient energy storage method, but he also points out that energy from the sun is virtually unlimited, and more solar collectors could make up for the inefficiency of hydrogen technology.”The Bossel paper did not consider the case of using sun to generate the hydrogen,” Abbott said. “So, of course all the inefficiencies added up and hydrogen looked bad compared to fossil fuels. But the point about solar energy is that there is so much of it that you only have to tap 5% of it at an efficiency as tiny as 1% and you already have energy over 5 times the whole world’s present consumption.”This demonstrates that efficiency is not the issue when you go solar. There is so much solar that all you have to do is invest in the non-recurring cost of more dishes to drive a solar-hydrogen economy at whatever efficiency it happens to sit at. I show in my paper that if you do this you come out cheaper than nuclear and you take up less than 8% of the world’s desert area. … So let’s begin now, what are we waiting for?”More information: Derek Abbott. “Keeping the energy debate clean: How do we supply the world’s energy needs?” Proceedings of the IEEE. To be published.• Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook!• Follow PhysOrg.com on Twitter!© 2009 PhysOrg.com Abbott calculates that, in order to supply the world’s energy needs, the footprint of such a system with pessimistic assumptions would be equivalent to a plot of land of about 1250 km by 1250 km – about 8% of the land area of the hot deserts of the world. With less pessimistic assumptions, the land area could be reduced to 500 km by 500 km, corresponding to 1.7 billion solar dishes that are each 10 meters wide. At massive volumes, if these Stirling engine dishes could be produced at a cost of $1,000 each, the total world cost would be $1.7 trillion – “which is less than the going rate of a war these days,” Abbott noted. He also believes that further cost savings can be made by considering 30-meter diameter dishes, driving much larger Rankine engines, in order to reduce overhead and maintenance costs.Ideally, Abbott says, solar farms should be distributed widely throughout the world in order to avoid geopolitical stresses and minimize transportation costs. Solar farms of one or two square km could be built in deserts in many regions: the Americas, Africa, Australasia, Asia, and the Middle East.Hydrogen: After connecting these solar farms to the local electricity grid, the electricity could then be used to electrolyze water to produce liquid hydrogen to run our vehicles. Abbott suggests that the next step would be to power public transport, such as buses, using liquid hydrogen. Then consumers could buy liquid hydrogen cars and refuel at public transport depots for a transition period until existing gasoline stations begin providing liquid hydrogen refueling.”Governments should begin by setting up sizable solar farms that supplement existing grid electricity and provide enough hydrogen to power buses,” Abbott said. “Enthusiasts will then buy hydrogen cars, retrofit existing cars, and refuel at bus depots. Then things will grow from there. You gotta start somewhere.”According to Abbott, running vehicles on hydrogen rather than electricity is superior in terms of sustainability. The batteries in electric vehicles consume chemicals and finite resources such as lithium, and release high levels of toxic waste. On the other hand, vehicles that burn hydrogen simply emit clean water vapor, and do not require the unsustainable use of chemicals. Other advantages of hydrogen vehicles are that today’s gasoline combustion engines can be retrofitted to run on hydrogen, and the car manufacturing industry has infrastructure tailored to combustion technology.”With solar-hydrogen, questions of safe handling are not the issue,” Abbott said. “Industry already uses 50 million tonnes of hydrogen annually, and so storage and handling are well-trodden areas. The BMW company has demonstrated the hydrogen combustion engine in a family-sized car [the BMW Hydrogen 7]. Also, 20% of buses in Berlin use hydrogen combustion.”center_img At the Stirling Energy Systems suncatcher dish farm being developed in California, 38-foot-diameter dishes power track the sun and each power a 25 kW Stirling cycle generator. Image credit: Stirling Energy Systems. Credit: Derek Abbott. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. For Derek Abbott, Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Adelaide in Australia, the answer is clear. In an invited opinion piece to be published in the Proceedings of the IEEE, Abbott argues that a solar-hydrogen economy is more sustainable and provides a vastly higher total power output potential than any other alternative. While he agrees with the current approach of promoting a mix of energy sources in the transition period toward a sustainable energy technology, he shows that solar-hydrogen should be the final goal of current energy policy. Eventually, as he suggests, this single dominant solution might supply 70% of the world’s energy while the remaining 30% is supplied by a mix of other sources.”My starting point is as an academic who always thought nuclear was the answer, but who then looked at the figures and came to an inescapable conclusion that solar-hydrogen is the long-term future,” Abbott told PhysOrg.com. “I did not come at this as a green evangelist. I am a reluctant convert. I deliberately don’t even mention the word CO2 once in my paper, in order to demonstrate that one can justify solar-hydrogen simply on grounds of economic resource viability without any green agenda.”In his paper, Abbott begins by providing an overview of the major non-renewable and renewable energy sources. To briefly summarize:Nuclear fission: While nuclear fission power plants may at first seem to have the economic advantage, they have “hidden costs” (the biggest being the $6 billion cost to decommission after a 30- or 40-year lifetime). In addition, nuclear fission isn’t sustainable: if fission hypothetically supplied the world’s energy needs, there would only be five years’ supply of uranium; and thorium, a suggested substitute, has a recoverable supply of only half of the world’s uranium reserves. Nuclear fusion: Abbott argues that nuclear fusion, which usually involves the fusion of deuterium and tritium, is not actually clean or sustainable. In addition to suffering from the same hidden costs as fission, tritium is considered dangerous enough to require weekly cleaning (as in the case of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Plus, tritium is bred by reacting neutrons with lithium; Abbott estimates that the world’s lithium reserves would last about 100 years if it were to supply the world’s energy along with continuing use in industrial applications, such as batteries, glass, ceramics, and lubricants. On the left is a vehicle with a hydrogen tank, and on the right a vehicle with a standard gasoline tank. Both tanks have been deliberately punctured and ignited. The top panel shows the two vehicles 3 seconds after ignition. We see that, due to the buoyancy of hydrogen, the flame shoots up vertically, whereas gasoline is heavy and spreads beneath the vehicle. The bottom panel shows the two vehicles 60 seconds after ignition. The hydrogen supply has burned off and the flame is diminished, whereas the gasoline fire has accelerated and has totally engulfed the vehicle on the right. Note that hydrogen flames are not intrinsically visible, but salt and particles in the ambient air burn off giving color to the flame as seen above. Image credit: University of Miami. On a related note, Abbott emphasizes that we need to preserve at least some of our remaining oil for uses other than energy – such as lubricating the world’s engines, as well as for making dyes, plastics, and synthetic rubber. Likewise, natural gas has industrial applications for making ammonia, glass and plastics, and coal for making soap, aspirin, tires, and other materials.Hydroelectric: Hydroelectricity currently provides 20% of the world’s electricity, with room for further growth. However, hydroelectricity could not supply the whole world’s power due to the limited availability of waterways. Plus, dams often have negative effects on aquatic ecosystems, as well as tourism, fisheries, and transport. Abbott also notes that, like wind, hydroelectric power is ultimately powered by the sun (via rain), a reminder that tapping the sun directly can offer large amounts of power.Geothermal: Pumping water below the Earth’s crust to create steam that can be used to generate electricity, geothermal power has shown to be cost-effective and sustainable, due to the large amounts of heat contained in the Earth. The downside, Abbott says, is that much of the energy is diffuse and unrecoverable, so that geothermal power could ultimately supply only a fraction of the world’s energy needs. In some cases, geothermal is also known to trigger unwanted seismic activity, and can bring toxic chemicals, such as hydrogen sulphide, arsenic, and mercury, to the Earth’s surface.Solar: For Abbott, the unambiguous leader of alternative energy sources is solar power, especially low-tech solar thermal collectors rather than high-tech silicon solar cells. Today, the world’s energy consumption is currently 15 TeraWatts (TW) (15 x 10^12 watts). The total solar energy that strikes the Earth is 166 Petawatts (PW) (166 x 10^15 watts). Even with 50% of this energy being reflected back into space or absorbed by clouds, the remaining 83 PW is more than 5,000 times our present global energy consumption. In contrast, the above sources of renewable energy (wind, hydroelectric, and geothermal) can supply less than 1% of solar power potential. The challenge, of course, is how to harness this large source of renewable, sustainable solar energy.”The fact that there simply is 5,000 times more sun power than our consumption needs makes me very optimistic,” Abbott said. “It’s a fantastic resource. We have the ingenuity to send man to the moon, so we definitively have the ingenuity to tap the sun’s resources.”Despite the improvements in silicon solar cells, Abbott argues that they suffer from low efficiencies and high environmental impact compared with solar thermal collectors. Solar cells require large amounts of water and arsenic; Abbott calculates that manufacturing enough solar cells to power the world would require 6 million tonnes of arsenic, while the world’s supply is estimated at about 1 million tonnes. Even the overall solar cell design is fundamentally flawed, he says. Solar cell semiconductor reliability drops as temperature increases, yet large temperature differences are required to increase thermodynamic efficiency. For this reason, semiconductor technology is much better suited to lower powers and temperatures, such as pocket calculators.On the other hand, solar thermal collectors are specifically designed to operate under hot temperatures. The idea is to use a curved mirror to focus sunlight to boil water and create steam, which is then used to power, for example, a Stirling heat engine to produce electricity. The system has already been demonstrated in California’s Mojave Desert, which has been using a solar thermal system to heat oil in a closed-cycle instead of water for the past 20 years.last_img read more