Month: June 2021

RBS 6 Nations: England analysis

first_imgAnd with that momentum, England had Farrell in the general’s seat silencing a few critics. There are those who feel he is a one-dimensional fly-half, a product of his Saracens upbringing. But Farrell played flat and with a wider screen vision than in any of his previous England appearances. His pass for Geoff Parling’s try was a thing of beauty.Johnny Sexton may play with a more natural élan but Farrell is unflappable. He is ferocious in defence, he boasts a fierce competitive streak and he can play a bit too.Farrell should be the British & Irish Lions Test fly-half this summer.Ruling the airwaves: Richie Gray beats Geoff Parling at a lineoutMidfield headacheKey to Farrell’s approach to the game was the presence outside him of Billy Twelvetrees, who enjoyed an eye-catching debut. It was not long before early comparisons with the Jonny Wilkinson-Will Greenwood axis were being made. Early days, early days. But there is a definite potential for a special partnership to build.Twelvetrees is tall and physical, he’s a strong ball-carrier with a fly-half’s view of the game.The question for Lancaster is whether he can risk heading to Ireland without Brad Barritt anchoring the defence at inside-centre. Manu Tuilagi is fit again and should start at 13. Twelvetrees is on a different level to Barritt with the ball in hand but the Saracen runs England’s defence. I say be bold. Farrell-Twelvetrees-Tuilagi will ask questions of the Irish midfield.Turnover troubleWhere England must improve is in their defence from turnover ball. Scotland punished them twice on Saturday, with tries from Maitland and Stuart Hogg, who was impressive for the visitors. Ireland will be a far more dangerous attacking prospect. There were a few lineout wobbles, too, which Parling will be slavishly ironing out this week. NOT FOR FEATURED Heading Down Under? Owen Farrell enhanced his Lions claims with a strong attacking performanceBy Alex LoweENGLAND RETAINED the Calcutta Cup and launched their Six Nations campaign with a 38-18 victory over Scotland at Twickenham, their biggest win in the fixture for six years. Here’s how…Possession is the lawEngland’s analysis of international rugby had told them that the majority of Test matches in 2012 were won by the team with the least possession. Not on Saturday.England wore Scotland down by bossing both territory (68.5%) and possession (62%) at Twickenham. From the moment Ben Morgan charged upfield in the opening seconds, bouncing Sean Maitland off, England’s ball-carriers had Scotland on the back foot.With Owen Farrell in imperious form behind dominant forwards who were securing quick ball, Scotland never got a foothold in the game.Even when Maitland had given Scotland a surprise lead, England simply marched back downfield and Farrell landed two penalties in quick succession, both earned at the breakdown, to regain control.Centre of attention: Billy TwelvetreesPass and move, it’s the England grooveOne year into Stuart Lancaster’s regime and England are looking to move their game on. They want to play at pace, to keep opposing defences in a permanent state of disorganisation and they achieved it with the forwards offloading and passing before contact. England made a staggering 194 passes and 19 offloads, a “risk-reward” tactic that kept the momentum up and meant Scotland were always scrambling, something they actually did well considering the weight of pressure on them.That game plan relies on good handling skills, which is where Mike Catt’s influence has been important.Lion in waiting To be looking to improve from a winning position, in the wake of a solid, satisfying first performance of the championship is just where Lancaster would want to be.Follow Alex Lowe on Twitter @AlexMLowe LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: England analysis: Round 3

first_imgFiery FarrellLancaster denied that Owen Farrell was playing through the red mist but there were times he lost his usual cucumber-cool temperament. Farrell is not shy of a scrap. He will fly in to help a team-mate in trouble but on Saturday he appeared to be looking for bother. He played as if his eye was not quite on the ball.Farrell’s combative, competitive nature is one of his biggest strengths but only when channeled constructively. Farrell seemed to be distracted by England’s desire to match the French physicality.He is is still my Lions fly-half for this summer but he cannot allow himself to get over-hyped.England’s rock: Robshaw was named Man of the MatchAnd yet England still won… England’s character, determination and collective belief kept them in the game until they took control in the final quarter. Wood’s performance as his best in an England jersey. Chris Robshaw was named man of the match again and Tuilagi came out handsomely on top of Mathieu Bastareaud, it was a personal duel which served as a microcosm for the game itself.For all the things that went against England, they are rapidly developing a reputation for being able to adapt and problem-solve on the hoof.It was not long ago that England players looked up to Martin Johnson in the coaching seats seeking instructions. England are now very well prepared and capable of winning matches in different ways.Tuesday training sessions are key to that. England’s 1st XV are pitched against a strong 2nd XV and they play out different match scenarios, often posing tougher questions to each other than they would face in a Test match.That strength in depth allowed England to win the game in the final quarter, with their bench making an impact in stark contrast to the French replacements. There is much to work on but also much to be encouraged by.Follow Alex Lowe on Twitter @AlexMLowe LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Wrecking ball: Manu Tuilagi won the midfield battle against France’s Mathieu Bastareaud but nearly lost an ear lobeBy Alex LoweENGLAND TOOK a giant leap towards their first Grand Slam in a decade with a 23-13 victory over France. The most important statistic is that Stuart Lancaster’s men found a way to win and that’s becoming a habit. Yet it was a far from perfect performance leaving much for the England management to address over the next fortnight.French upper hand: England’s set piece needs to improveSet piece problems England are scratching out results despite their scrum and lineout underperforming. Thomas Domingo, the squat French loosehead, caused Dan Cole significant problems on Saturday, just as Cian Healy had done in Dublin. Cole’s contribution at the breakdown is integral to England but Graham Rowntree has already expressed concerns over the Leicester man’s scrummaging consistency.Italy boast a bigger front row, which may actually help England, but Cole will then face the Wales loosehead Gethin Jenkins, who is back on form and led the destruction of the Azzurri this weekend.England’s scrummaging issues are replicated in the lineout, which is far from being the well-oiled machine Geoff Parling dreams aspires to. An 81% success rate on their own throw is not good enough.Defensive drills ahead England pride themselves on their defensive performance. It is what gives them their “bounce”, as Mike Brown put it. In Dublin it earned them a victory, their line-speed squeezing the life out of Ireland. But against France it could have cost them. England missed 21 tackles, five of them in the one searing break from Wesley Fofana for the French try. As a team it was uncharacteristic. Joe Launchbury, Brad Barritt, Tom Wood and Chris Robshaw all put in huge shifts but Andy Farrell will be concerned by the way France got outside them. Italy may not pose the same kind of attacking threat but Wales will, especially if they have the extra motivation of denying England a Grand Slam.Dangerous Wasp: could Wade replace Ashton on the wing?Ash splash dried up The Saracens wing is not himself. Chris Ashton appears to have lost his joie de vivre and he is certainly being exposed defensively. This time last year Stuart Lancaster was describing Ashton as a unique talent. Now, he is openly floating the idea of starting with Manu Tuilagi on the wing against Italy. It was not really a game for the wide men but Brown ensured he made an impact in the second half. Ashton did not.I am not convinced by Tuilagi on the wing. Not only do we never see him under a high ball, he needs to be at the heart of the action, tearing holes in opposing midfields.If he can do that from the wing then it would give England the chance to play an extra playmaker in Billy Twelvetrees. Otherwise, if Lancaster wants to send Ashton a message it should be in the shape of Ben Foden or the electric Christian Wade.last_img read more

England name EPS squad for QBE Tests

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Forwards 
David Attwood (Bath Rugby) 
Dan Cole (Leicester Tigers) 
Alex Corbisiero (Northampton Saints) 
Tom Johnson (Exeter Chiefs) 
Dylan Hartley (Northampton Saints) 
Matt Kvesic (Gloucester Rugby) 
Joe Launchbury (London Wasps) 
Courtney Lawes (Northampton Saints) 
Joe Marler (Harlequins) 
Ben Morgan (Gloucester Rugby) 
Geoff Parling (Leicester Tigers) 
Chris Robshaw (Harlequins) 
Billy Vunipola (Saracens) 
Mako Vunipola (Saracens) 
David Wilson (Bath Rugby) 
Tom Wood (Northampton Saints) 
Tom Youngs (Leicester Tigers)Backs 
Chris Ashton (Saracens) 
Mike Brown (Harlequins) 
Freddie Burns (Gloucester Rugby) 
Luther Burrell (Northampton Saints) 
Danny Care (Harlequins) 
Lee Dickson (Northampton Saints) 
Kyle Eastmond (Bath Rugby) 
Owen Farrell (Saracens) 
Toby Flood (Leicester Tigers) 
Ben Foden (Northampton Saints) 
Alex Goode (Saracens) 
Henry Trinder (Gloucester Rugby) 
Joel Tomkins (Saracens) 
Billy Twelvetrees (Gloucester Rugby) 
Christian Wade (London Wasps) 
Marland Yarde (London Irish) 
Ben Youngs (Leicester Tigers) Breaking in: Gloucester’s Henry Trinder has shown enough to force his way into England’s EPS for the TestsSTUART LANCASTER has had his hand forced as he brings in three centres and a flanker for the upcoming QBE Internationals.With Brad Barritt and Manu Tuilagi out for the duration of the Test series and with so many players in form it is no surprise that the coach has called up three differing uncapped centres, with Luther Burrell of Northampton Saints, Henry Trinder of Gloucester and Joel Tomkins of Saracens coming in, with Burrell seen as injury cover.Exeter Chiefs’ Tom Johnson also sees his fine form rewarded with a spot in the squad, replacing Tom Croft who has a serious knee injury.Talking at the aanouncement, Lancaster said: “Inevitably there have been some injuries and there is still a big European weekend ahead. But injures always create opportunities and we are pleased to call up Tom Johnson, Joel Tomkins, Henry Trinder and Luther Burrell into the Senior EPS, with Luther joining us as injury cover so it will be great for him to come in and put a marker down in what is going to be a competitive selection leading into the Australia game.center_img “We have three major Tests ahead of us and we are looking forward to the challenge.”England Elite Player Squad for QBE Internationalslast_img read more

Sean O’Brien and Ireland will learn fate at disciplinary hearing today

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The 2015 Rugby World Cup has produced some fantastic moments so far and has sold over 2.4 million tickets. However for all the magnificient rugby produced, there have been moments of controversy and ill-discipline. Sean O’Brien and Ireland will learn their fate at a disciplinary hearing on Tuesday in London at 1pm. Power punch from Seán O’Brien https://t.co/6BeI2lIgmh— EatSleepRugby (@eatsleeprugby) October 11, 2015Citing Commissioner Dougie Hunter cited O’Brien under Law 10.4 (a): “A player must not strike an opponent with the fist or arm, including the elbow, shoulder, head or knee(s).”The citing process during this World Cup has not been without controversy, with many believing the powers have been unfairly strict on in some cases. For example, Alesana Tuilagi  was originally banned for five weeks after he was deemed to have struck Japan’s Harumichi Tatekawa with his knee. On review it was reduced to two weeks. Ireland will today learn whether they will be without Sean O’Brien after he was cited on Monday night following their victory over France. To make matters worse for the Irish they will also be without the stricken Paul O’Connell and Peter O’Mahony, whilst Johnny Sexton remains a doubt. The numbers injured so far at this World Cup has been staggering with 33 players pulling out so far; this contrasts vastly to the number of injuries seen at the World Cup in 2011 which was only 16 at this exact stage.The Leinster player was cited on Monday night for striking Pascal Papé in the first minute of Ireland’s 24-9 win over France last Sunday. The minimum suspension for this action would be two weeks meaning that the 28-year-old back-row would miss at least the quarter-final if the citing is upheld. Below is a clip of Sean O’Brien’s striking action. Five-week ban for this by Alesana Tuilagi? Really? “Striking with the knee.” pic.twitter.com/ILhe4OxBMu— Ben Coles (@bencoles_) October 7, 2015And now it seems that the citing commission are copping even more flak from pundits and fans after Ross Ford and Jonny Gray were cited for dangerous tackles following the Scotland and Samoa match. Lock Gray is deemed to have made an illegal tip tackle against Samoa.Their fate will be decided by independent judicial officer Christopher Quinlan QC. They were both were charged by Australian independent citing commissioner Scott Nowland.center_img Big day: Sean O’Brien will find out on Tuesday afternoon if he is to be banned @AndyNic9 @SDM_Robertson pic.twitter.com/pLw3kSrpxx— Gavin Chapman (@gavinc42) October 12, 2015 What have you made of these incidents? Let us know on Twitter – @Rugbyworldmag – or on Facebook – Rugby World Magazine.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Hotshot: Leinster wing Jordan Larmour

first_img Jordan Larmour was the only uncapped player named in Ireland’s Six Nations squad for the 2018 championship and is set to make his international debut against Italy having been named on the bench.The back-three player is one of the brightest prospects in the game having shone for Leinster this season, scoring brilliant tries against Ulster and Munster.Rugby World magazine spoke to Larmour earlier in the season to find out more about him – read his interview below.Watch Jordan Larmour’s fantastic try against Munster below:Age 20 (10 June 1997) Born Dublin Province Leinster Country Ireland Position Back threeHow did you get involved in rugby? I started aged seven at my local club and I played for my school, St Andrew’s College, too.You also played hockey at age-grade level for Ireland… Yes, U16s and a bit of U18s. I played rugby and hockey up until sixth year (17), but after that I focused on rugby. I just enjoyed it more. I’d always wanted to play professional rugby.Who was your childhood hero? Brian O’Driscoll. I remember watching the 2009 Heineken Cup semi-final against Munster and he scored an interception. He was one of those guys who could just change a game and make something out of nothing.What positions have you played? I played centre in school but when I started playing with Leinster U18, U19 and U20 I was at full-back or on the wing. At the moment I really enjoy full-back because you get a bit more space on the ball and can counter-attack.When did you join up with Leinster? Point made: Jordan Larmour has impressed for Leinster this season. Photo: Getty Images This article first appeared in the December 2017 issue of Rugby World. Last year I was in the sub-academy for six months and got bumped up to the academy. This is the first year that I’ve been involved from the start, doing pre-season and everything. Girvan Dempsey has been really helpful and, as he played full-back, I can talk to him about different things.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREYou scored on your debut against the Dragons… That was really special. It wasn’t a very good try, only from about five metres, but I’ll take it! The Pro14 is a bit quicker and everyone is bigger, but you just go back to playing rugby.What Ireland levels have you played? U18, U19 and U20. I played for the U18s a year young and had a great experience at the FIRA tournament in Poland. We got to the final and lost to England. For the U19s I played France twice and then the U20s was the best because you get the Six Nations, but unfortunately I didn’t go to the World Cup as I was injured.Watch Jordan Larmour score against Ulster below:What are your strengths? Speed and footwork.And your goals? I want to try to break into the Leinster team and become a regular starter. Then I want to get picked for Ireland. I trained twice with them last year and that was a cool experience. Everyone is unbelievable – no one ever drops a ball.RW Verdict: Larmour keeps busy off the field – he’s a keen golfer and is studying sports psychology – but is making a bigger impact on it. He’s already on Joe Schmidt’s radar and more game time at Leinster will only see him improve. TAGS: Leinster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS An exclusive Q&A with Leinster’s up-and-coming wing Jordan Larmourlast_img read more

Why don’t movies get rugby scenes right?

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Screenwriter Simon Uttley discusses the challenges of having rugby action in a film A still from the Invictus trailer“It’s similar to the way soldiers (or other professionals) will often criticise the lack of accuracy on screen. But for the film-makers, and probably 95% of the audience, technical accuracy will usually – unless rigid accuracy is the point – come a distant second to the emotion of the characters and the narrative they’re going through. And maybe the writer has never played the game.“I write a lot of action scenes and have never (yet) been in a car chase, shoot-out or battle with aliens. So they’re faking it. Maybe the director is faking it too, and the actors and so on. And to most people they’ll just see ‘rugby scene’ and think it looks fine as opposed to ‘that tighthead’s binding is all over the shop!’Related: Matt Damon talks about learning rugby for Invictus“So, unless they get it 100% spot on, or unless the drama is so satisfying you don’t care that it’s not 100% spot on, then you can get pulled out of the story.“Not that you can’t script great sporting moments. Despite the cries of ‘you couldn’t make it up’, literally if you were attempting to write about the 2003 World Cup final you would probably make something up exactly like what happened.“But so much of the true drama of sport comes because it’s unscripted and undirected. That’s where the real thrill comes. And when you’re used to that – and with rugby we’re also used to pretty great ‘on tour’ videos with the British & Irish Lions – anything that’s even slightly off sticks out. I think anyway.”Uttley – the son of former England and Lions lock Roger and whose brother, Ben, helmed the last three Lions documentaries – says he would consider writing a screenplay for rugby. But it would depend very much on the story first. Photo call: Morgan Freeman at the ‘Invictus’ premiere in Rome (Getty Images) center_img Why don’t movies get rugby scenes right?It’s rare that a die-hard fan sees a rugby scene in a movie and gives it a big thumbs-up. But it cannot be easy to capture the essence of such a complex game on the silver screen, whilst also conveying a sense of cinematic drama. We wondered: how difficult is it to get right?So we asked an experienced screenwriter who knows their rugby what they thought. Simon Uttley gives us some considered thoughts on the inherent issues that surround showing an audience match action.Here is what he says:“Logistically it is interesting. Films are used to portraying large-scale carnage, so you would think rugby would be easy on that front. And I would say most sports films face the same kind of logistic hurdles – how do we fake something to make it look real?“But in general, of what I have seen, most of the time it’s probably a slight rugby riff on the uncanny valley. If you’re used to playing or watching a lot of rugby then you innately know what feels right and what feels a little off.Related: What is the best rugby movie?“Movies – unless they’re using archive or documentary footage – aren’t always going for 100% verisimilitude or accuracy. So even if they get in a consultant (which I’m sure they do) to make sure the rugby scenes feel right, they’re probably not going to have two teams, stars included, of professional-level rugby players going at each other hammer and tongs.“Which automatically reduces how ‘accurate’ the scene is going to feel, though maybe only by a degree or two. But sometimes that’s all it takes to take you out of the moment.“On top of that, the angles used and the way they’ll need to set up and ultimately end updating around certain moments to fit the narrative will further remove that feeling of authenticity. Or can do. So the drop-goal scene in Invictus ramps up the slo-mo effect and sound design for dramatic effect, but if you spend a lot of time watching and/or playing rugby you’re probably distracted by that. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Massachusetts bishop undergoes surgery

first_img Donald Lamb says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Sanford Z. K. Hampton says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Sheila Long, OSB says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Massachusetts bishop undergoes surgery This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Health & Healthcare, Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. May 20, 2013 at 5:35 pm Know that the prayers of many are with you as you recover.Fr John and Maryfran Crist New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books House of Bishops Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By ENS staffPosted May 20, 2013 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Comments (5) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service May 23, 2013 at 12:56 pm Assuring Bishop Tom of prayers for a full and complete recovery.Gaylord Hitchcock+ Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Rev. JohnCrist says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA May 20, 2013 at 6:37 pm The sisters of Transfiguration Monastery in Windsor, NY, are praying for you. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID May 20, 2013 at 5:23 pm Mari and I will be holding Tom in our prayers both for a favorable pathology report and for his complete healing.Mari and +Sandy HamptonBishop Assisting in Olympia The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fr Gaylord Hitchcock says: [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts Thomas Shaw underwent surgery May 17 to remove a mass on his brain that was discovered following tests conducted a day earlier.A series of updates posted on the diocesan website confirmed that the surgery went well, with no complications, and that Shaw moved out of the intensive care unit on May 18 and “was up and walking.”Shaw offered gratitude “for the prayers for him, for his Society of St. John the Evangelist community and for the diocese, and asks for continued prayers.”The Rev. Canon Mally Lloyd, canon to the ordinary, wrote that more will be known “in a week or so” as to whether any further treatment is necessary.“Bishop Tom and all of us feel the unexpectedness of this, but please know that he has confidence in his doctors and was well prepared for the surgery,” wrote Lloyd, who spent time with the bishop pre-surgery at the hospital and said he “was in good spirits, was engaged with the ongoing matters of diocesan life and, as always, his faith and confidence were contagious.”In January Shaw, 67, called for the election of a bishop coadjutor in April 2014 to succeed him when he retires. The diocese anticipates ordaining and consecrating the coadjutor in the fall of 2014 and Shaw said he would spend time working with the new bishop before he retires. That date had not been determined at the time of the announcement. Shaw is in his 19th year as bishop. May 20, 2013 at 7:06 pm Our prayers are with Thomas, the SSJE, and the Diocese..don Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Bishop Tengatenga on faith, controversy and the Anglican Communion

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Archbishop of Canterbury Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Comments (5) December 10, 2014 at 5:02 pm Problem is, “Follow Jesus” is completely meaningless without a statement of who and what Jesus is, and what he teaches. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service – Charleston, South Carolina] Former Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga, who chairs the Anglican Consultative Council (ACC), says the Anglican Communion is still in the middle of painful struggles, but those struggles have made its members “think about who we are, what we are about, and not only think about it but actually talk about it and engage with it.”“So, one hopes then that we are more intelligent about our faith and our being,” Tengatenga said during a recent interview with Episcopal News Service.Tengatenga also spoke during the interview about the structure and importance of the ACC (the Communion’s main policy-making body), the possibility of an Anglican Congress and the influences on his religious life.ENS spoke with Tengatenga during his visit to the Episcopal Church in South Carolina’s 224th annual convention. He was the preacher for the convention’s opening Eucharist.Tengatenga was appointed in May as distinguished visiting professor of global Anglicanism at the University of the South’s School of Theology in Sewanee, Tennessee.[ooyala code=”drdmw0cjrfp8O-y-1-4O28OfNtgbUOcT” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″] December 23, 2014 at 3:04 pm As someone who has lived in a microcosm of the Communion for over thirteen years now, and who has had numerous contacts with people and churches around the Communion, I agree that the Communion is not dead. Quite the contrary. When we begin to realize anew what we have in our hands to effect transformation around the world by proclaiming the Good News of God in Christ through word and example, and working together for justice and peace, people will come to a new perspective.The Toronto Congress was organized by my predecessor as Bishop in charge, Stephen Bayne, and MRI had a huge impact on the churches of the Communion. We really do need another, but we also need a Primates Meeting, a Lambeth Conference, and yes, the ACC. I thank God for Bishop Tengatenga’s leadership. December 12, 2014 at 12:42 pm Gerard: A few non-negotiables from the mouth of Christ himself (“doctrine” if you will) are the point of contention:1). From that time on Jesus began to preach, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.”2). “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except by Me.”3). ““Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”4). “I am the resurrection and the life.” … and many others from the mouth of Christ. These are core (if one believes that Jesus Himself had something to say about Himself that trumps human reason and subjective truth).A careful observer in the Episcopal Church will notice that these points are not entirely settled in the sermons, teachings, and messages of notable leaders as though some new revelation supersedes the faith once delivered…. or worse that Christ didn’t “mean what He said”. I defer to C.S. Lewis who noted that you must either believe that Jesus’ claims about Himself are the ravings of a lunatic, or that He is who who said, and said what He means. He can’t be both. That’s the fallacy of those who mangle “The Middle Way” in an attempt to bring synergy of Jesus’ claims and their own limitations (biases and blind spots often blamed on the Holy Spirit). There are truths out there. We’re supposed to be people who have seen and heard. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Jeremy Bates says: Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Tags Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Alda Morgan says: Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 10, 2014 at 5:09 pm I find this an enormously encouraging and reassuring article. The last few years with the Church riven by our various disagreements have been scary. It helps to hear from one who knows the communion so well and doesn’t evade its problems, but still has hope and confidence that–broken and faithless as we’ve been at times–God still holds us and is at work through us. Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 10, 2014 Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Doug Desper says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An edited transcript of the rest of the ENS interview follows.As chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, what do you identify as the mission priorities for the Anglican Communion at this time?The first one is just being present with people in their circumstances – given all the pain, hatred and war, and the natural calamities that have befallen the world at the moment –either simply by prayer or by coordinating relief work; being the presence of Christ in the world in that way.Secondly, and it is strange to put it second because it undergirds everything, the actual proclamation of the Gospel in word by evangelizing; continuously standing for the Gospel for the people of God and also bringing people to Christ because that’s our job individually and as Communion.And, obviously, reconciliation in the glaring, controversial decade we have been through and also simply reconciling with our own humanity [which] I hope also then becomes a witness [to] the world, with creation, with wealth disparity, ideological disparity. We’re talking about a globalization which should resonate with catholicity but it doesn’t. The current globalization is hegemonic of a particular ideological kind. So the mission now of the church, I believe, is reconciling that and turning people back to God, to being reconciled with themselves, reconciled with nature, reconciled with the economic order.How have you enjoyed this role since you took the helm of the ACC in 2009? I imagine there have been both moments of joy and frustration.Former Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga, chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, preaches Nov. 7, 2012 in the Auckland, New Zealand Holy Trinity Cathedral during the closing Eucharist of the ACC’s 15th meeting. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSThe church of God lives on in spite of our squabbles and misunderstandings and divisions. So the joy of being able to see the church catholic alive at work in the midst of all the confusion is priceless. And also I’ve now had two different archbishops [of Canterbury] with two different styles, each one so committed to lead the church and the people of God in the direction that will truly proclaim the Gospel … and continuing to build on that which we have received through Christ and through his church.Of course, the pain is the continued declaration of cessation of relationships. I hear it – it hurts to hear that – and [I hear the] blames left, right and center about what causes that and where it’s going to be. I’ve yet to see the physicality of that because the theological reality of the body of Christ remains, albeit strained, but it is watching that strain that is painful and stressful because it eats on you when you see brother turning against brother and sister turning against sister, and beginning to demonize each other and forgetting the truth that we are saints.Do you believe the Anglican Communion is in a healthier place than it was a decade ago?Yes, because sometimes people confuse painlessness and health. I mean, I used to run once upon a time when I was young, and running in Texas heat in midday doing 10 kilometers just for the fun of it hurt, but it was fun and it was healthy. I think that’s where we are. We are in the middle of painful struggles, like I said, but it has made us think about who we are, what we are about, and not only think about it but actually talk about it and engage with it. So, one hopes then that we are more intelligent about our faith and our being.Communion for those of us who have always been Anglican is something we’ve always taken for granted and that’s why it’s been difficult to define what holds us together. Paper doesn’t, law doesn’t, even sacraments don’t. It’s something beyond words that holds us together and that is Christ himself and his very spirit. So struggling to articulate that, which I hear all over the place, is for me a healthy sign.And even for those who have chosen to leave, guess what they’re called? Anglican this, Anglican that. We are struggling to actually articulate what it is that we hold so dearly and can’t let go. So if I really don’t want this, I would quit and when I quit I wouldn’t want to be identified with it in any way, shape or form. So, why do you quit and want to continue to be identified with something?It means there is something significant about the nature of the church and the struggle to find ourselves and our soul and where God is moving us to. If that is painful, I would want to think that it is painful in the kind of exercise pain [way] where you feel that healthiness of coming out of that struggle of self-identification and self-understanding in God. Whether someone will come and fully take [the] temperature and say ‘this is healthy,’ I always believe that’s God’s business, not human business. We can see signs, we can do something about them but it’s God’s business to actually declare the health of God’s people.With centuries-old church structures being challenged and facing reform, do you think the Anglican Consultative Council, in its current make up, is the right model for the work it and the Communion have to do in the 21st century?The Anglican Consultative Council last met Oct. 27-Nov. 7, 2012, mainly at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Auckland, New Zealand. The ACC includes bishops, clergy and lay people. One to three persons come from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENSCurrently, I would want to say yes and I don’t think it can be anything else from what it is now, in the sense of … we have a model. Now that we have that model, how do we perfect it and make it do what we intend for it to do in order to organize ourselves?We can’t call ourselves ‘Communion’ and not have a physical reality of experiencing that. The only place we experience that – and I want to emphasize that – the only place currently where we experience that is the ACC. There is never any time when the Communion comes together in a visible form, physical representatives of each and every province, and each and every order, in the way that we organize ourselves [other than the ACC]. The question is how do we make it work better. How do we make it be that body that we have intended it to be?I think for a long time the Communion in its life has lived as though [the ACC] didn’t exist. Not that it didn’t exist, but we lived as though it didn’t; it didn’t matter. I think that is why I am saying the church is in a healthier place now because it is actually looking at itself and the systems that it set in place to be able to fully minister and to fully reflect its catholicity and to fully reflect the Gospel in a way that is respectful of the uniqueness of each member individually, the uniqueness of each member in orders, uniqueness of each province – each church – because we are a communion of churches. It is this that facilitates that uniqueness and yet that unity at the same time.Certainly, I am not saying that it is perfect, not only because I think perfection is for the future and is that which we work at every day, but because I think it’s a living organism. And was there ever a time when the church was continuously the same? No. From Jesus’ time we’ve been in transformation . . . morphing into what we have become.I’m not sure we can do much better than where we are now. It would take a few decades to get anywhere because we work in triennials and sometimes in other places biennials in the different provinces. So, even if we were to say overnight we want to change this, it would take a minimum of six years even to define what it is that we want before we can begin to ask [if] we have defined it, now do we accept it. Then another six years before we can accept it.A group of bishops from around the Anglican Communion recently met in New York and their communiqué asked whether it was time for another Anglican Congress. What is your reaction to that idea?It’s always been time for another congress. The first one was in 1908 and as a Communion we intended not only to have another one, we intended to celebrate a century of that with the Lambeth [Conference] 2008, but the finances were wanting in that process. It failed us.I was part of the planning of the last Lambeth Conference and our initial charge was to plan a congress – a gathering – alongside Lambeth Conference, which was almost an exact mirror of 1908.Then, of course the next [Anglican Congress after the 1908 gathering] happened in ’54 in Minneapolis and the last one in Toronto [in 1963] and the idea was, that given the Toronto timing which was five years before the next Lambeth Conference, to be a possible pattern in which we could do congresses every five years.Interestingly enough, I was dealing with this in my class earlier this week and talking about jamborees. I know there is a cynical view of jamboree but if you ask anyone who has been to a jamboree, given that the language that comes from the Boy Scout movement, which incidentally began in 1908, it has transformed their outlook not only of the Scouting movement but of their own personal being. That is what this is about.“Communion for those of us who have always been Anglican is something we’ve always taken for granted and that’s why it’s been difficult to define what holds us together,”says Bishop James Tengatenga, who chairs the Anglican Consultative Council. Photo: Diocese of Texas[Anglican Congresses] are seminal in the sense that we think afresh, unencumbered admin[istration]. Admin is important and I don’t think, like some people have been saying, simply maybe we should replace the Lambeth Conference and just have congress instead. I think that’s a fallacy, really. You can’t do that; you will create another Lambeth-type thing because you can’t have an organization and not have leaders meeting and doing admin. [But there isn’t time there in those type of meetings] to get down to the roots of what we believe and what we may be looking at in a seminal way that congresses have done.[Congresses] have marked our life . . . 1963 made us reflect on what does it mean to engage in mission in a multinational, multicultural body and in an unequal society where some have and some don’t. And is it true that some have and some don’t? Or is it the question that some have something else and others have something else, and together we are therefore mutually responsible to one another and mutually interdependent? [The 1963 Anglican Congress] gave us the language of mutual responsibility and mutual interdependence …We became attentive and attuned to the fact that we are partnered with one another, but had never quite defined what that was, and how long it can be and what form it takes, and the givers and takers, and so forth. And we [had] never figured out what it was to be in mission so those that were involved in mission simply went to places to do what they thought was important to them. We can almost say that what we are working through is what we said in ‘Mutual Responsibility and Interdependence.’ And mutuality continues to be questioned; responsibility to one another [continues to be questioned].So these [congresses] are seminal to the way we look at ourselves and engage in God’s work. I don’t think there will ever be a time when we don’t need one. I think the question is can we be responsible enough as Communion to figure out to organize one, foot the bill and make it work, and not turn it into showmanship.You were at the center of a controversy last year when your appointment at Dartmouth College was withdrawn over comments you had made about homosexuality. What did you learn from that experience or are you still learning from it?I don’t think there will be a time that I exhaust the learning from that experience; it’s fraught with all kinds of things. It was a painful experience.Basically you find that people are still suspicious of the ‘different,’ whatever the different is, and, on the basis of that, make judgment calls that don’t hold substance, but unfortunately if you are so inclined as to believe yourself rather than the truth that’s facing you then you end up doing stuff.And also learning to appreciate the love of God’s people because the response I got in my support after that experience, I cannot even begin to tell.And also then obviously learning to be in the wilderness because at that point then, what next?And then Sewanee came next. What is your focus at Sewanee?Teaching mission studies – missiology – and teaching it, looking at it from my perspective, from the world I live in as a recipient – a product of – mission, and an agent of mission … It’s basically like, well, here’s time to share my story with Jesus and his work and what it has been, but in an academic sense and shaping people for ministry. And also talking about global Anglicanism.It is a privilege, really, to be able to share my lived experience of the catholicity of the church and the way the councils of the church work. All of us imagine we know, but what we know is only what we have experienced or heard within the context of the controversy today, but to think that the Communion is bigger than that and is older than that. We may not have articulated it the same way, but we have seen it unfold before our eyes from way back when.[I also ask about] how is that Anglicanism today an expression of God in the world, in the participation in God in the world, an expression of but one experience of the people of God in his catholic church. Being able to talk about that and also discovering with the students the humility of an Anglican stance, which is, from day one, Anglicanism never considered itself to be the full and sum total of the church catholic. It has always seen itself as but one expression of the church catholic and making us so disposed, therefore, towards the unity of the people of God and working towards it.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Zachary Brooks says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET December 27, 2014 at 8:53 am This interview would be heartening were it not for the fact that Bishop Tengatenga slips into speaking of the Anglican Communion as one “church.”Of course he is not alone in this manner of speaking. It is a habit of people who are involved in the so-called “Instruments of Communion.” Perhaps unsurprisingly, people at the center of the Communion like to think that they run a global church.But the Anglican Communion is not one church. It is a family of independent churches.None of the Instruments of Communion, including the ACC, has any authority at all over any Communion Province. This is something that we should all remember. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Consultative Council, Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Pierre Whalon says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Tengatenga on faith, controversy and the Anglican Communionlast_img read more

Bishops speak out on resumption of death penalty for drugs…

first_img Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Bishops speak out on resumption of death penalty for drugs offenders in Sri Lanka Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Posted Jul 18, 2018 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Asia An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishops of the Church of Ceylon have spoken out after reports that Sri Lanka’s president and cabinet have moved to reinstate the death penalty for prisoners convicted of drugs offenses. There has been a moratorium on the use of the death penalty in the country since 1976, with sentences of death commuted to life imprisonment. But now President Maithripala Sirisena has said that he will sign execution orders for people convicted of drug trafficking who are said to be continued to be involved in offeses despite being in prison. The move has been opposed groups as diverse as the Human Rights Commission, the European Union, Amnesty International and the country’s Anglican Church.Read full article here. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Servicelast_img read more

From the editors: Episcopal News Service to disable comments

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Lou Schoen says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Douglas Crellin says: william dailey says: Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Elizabeth A Triano says: Douglas Crellin says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 30, 2018 at 3:15 pm I am sorry to read this, and I certainly understand your decision. Thank you for all that you do. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Stuart Ibberson says: August 30, 2018 at 4:19 pm While I lament this decision I certainly understand it. Over the past few years I have seen many media outlets do the same thing; not do stifle discussion and respectful dissent, but to avoid the hatred, vitriol and name calling that so often accompanies comments. Some UK-based newspapers have moved to a model whereby comment-making is disabled on controversial stories, and left intact on not so controversial stories. I myself have been on the receiving end of such attacks, up to and including death threats. As it is, ENS has preserved the option of commenting on various stories via Facebook and Twitter – so we can still have our discussions, just not on this platform. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group August 30, 2018 at 3:41 pm Cowardly is the first thought that comes to mind, but then I reflected and realized it is not cowardly it is strategic to silent dissenting voices. Trying moderating and removing objectionable content and contributors. I am sure this is a lesson learned from our brethren in the Catholic church who are shut down from commenting on the appalling leadership that led to and in some cases allowed the outright disgusting abuse of children. Shame on you, shame on you. One more reason to leave this “church” that has become more interested in becoming a progressive political voice than a place of worship. I find no reason to subscribe now since this will just be one view with no feedback loop. Sad, truly sad. I will pray for all of you. August 30, 2018 at 3:28 pm I agree with this decision. The direction of the church will proceed much more smoothly if those who disagree (agreeably or disagreeably) are silenced. The discomfort to those who disagree with those who disagree must be recognized and avoided at all costs. After all we do live in a grown up world-don’t we? Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK August 30, 2018 at 3:26 pm This decision only reflects your unwillingness to accept the fact that not all Episcopalians agree with your point of view on many of the issues you seem to espouse. Very sad, indeed. August 30, 2018 at 3:19 pm This is a real shame. Why not enforce some guidelines rather than pulling the plug outright? Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 30, 2018 at 4:22 pm After seeing some of the hateful dialogue about race-based issues during General Convention, I can only say ‘thank you.’ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET August 30, 2018 at 3:03 pm I have noticed the same trend toward disrespectful comments adding nothing to the subject under discussion. I think you have made the right decision. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska From the editors: Episcopal News Service to disable comments Featured Jobs & Calls August 30, 2018 at 3:45 pm And I have one last comment. This is the year of evangelism yes? How does that stand hand in hand with shutting down discussion? Good luck with your new evangelism model of we preach you listen, your response is no longer requested. Anthony Price says: [Episcopal News Service] When we invited our readers to comment on Episcopal News Service stories nearly seven years ago, we did so in the spirit of generating and encouraging discussion related to our content.However, increasingly, some voices have come to dominate the discussion, which at times has strayed from the stories themselves into theological and ideological arguments. We value our readers and we value civil discourse, but we can no longer offer a comment function on our website. Readers may still, however, comment on ENS stories on Facebook and Twitter. Readers who would like to comment directly to us may do so via [email protected] are far from alone in this decision. Beginning at least in late 2014 and continuing to now, media organizations far larger than ENS have decided to stop allowing comments on their stories. They range from Reuters and USA Today to the Atlantic and National Public Radio. We regret this trend and the polarization that promoted it. We pray for a time when people can, in the words of Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby “learn to disagree well.”The editors  Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Jim Cutshall says: Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Marylin Day says: Fred Fenton says: Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Wink McKinnon says: Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA August 30, 2018 at 3:25 pm Sad, being afraid of comments and discussions on gives on side or point of view. That is a problem when that occurs. Sorry the “bosses” are afraid to let others speak. Dagmar Hamberger says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Aug 30, 2018 Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (12) August 30, 2018 at 4:06 pm It’s an understandable decision that ENS does not want to have to moderate multiple discussions on multiple platforms. The time and effort can hopefully go in maintaining and adjusting over and over the quality of the site to developments in society and technology.After all, the change is not even a paywall, it’s still free (and ad-free!) content that everybody is free to share and comment on whatever social network they use. August 30, 2018 at 3:26 pm So sad…some comments are very thoughtful. Is this an austerity move? Can you pay for monitoring and removal if not within guidelines? Here’s hoping you are making the correct decision since as people become more disengaged, your readership may decline substantially. Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more