Tag: 上海千花验证归来

Ocean City Primary School Students Get Moving to Raise Funds

first_imgPrimary School students race around the field for the district’s first Fun Run Fundraiser. By Maddy VitaleOcean City Primary School students went the distance – literally – Thursday in the district’s first Fun Run Fundraiser, raising an estimated $9,000 for matching grants and class trips.From pre-kindergarten to third grade, the students raced around the field while music played in the background and Principal Kathy Smith, PTA members and others kept the kids excited about the event. The object for the children was to run or walk as many laps as they had sponsors for. The back of their T-shirts showed a circle with lap numbers. Some were checked off up to the entire 35-lap event while others were somewhere in the middle.Bella Sullivan, 4, holds up a sign in support of participants in the Fun Run.Either way, there were a lot of children running and walking. Parents and friends watched on the sidelines and cheered in support.Bella Sullivan, 4, held up a sign in support of her friends and cousin who were participating in the run. Kaiden Janto, 7, who is in the second grade, summed up what the fundraiser meant to him.“It’s fun,” he shouted. Theresa Straub, of Ocean City, watched as her sons, Connor, 7, a first-grader and second-grader Christopher, 8, jetted around the field.Theresa Straub, of Ocean City, watches as her two sons zip around the field.“My kids were both really excited and energized leading up to the event,” Straub said. “It is really nice to see it is not materialistic or about selling candy bars. It is getting the kids out on a beautiful day.”Parent Teacher Association President Jocelyn Palaganas said the district hired a company called Boosterthon to come to the school to teach about character education and get the students pumped up for the fundraiser with a pep rally. Classes gathered as teams. Events were held throughout the week and showcased the children’s team spirit as they participated in games all in preparation for Thursday’s finale.Palaganas said other districts have these Fun Run Fundraisers.“The PTA is always looking for new ways to fundraise,” she said. “No one does pizza or popcorn anymore.”Pre-kindergarten students hold hands as they walk a lap.Another Fun Run Fundraiser will be held Friday at the Ocean City Intermediate School. It will be held indoors due to a rainy forecast, school officials said.PTA member Erica Schaffer said of the Fun Run: “I saw it at other schools and fell in love with the idea of making money for schools, character education and a pep rally. This is just a great event for the schools.”Palaganas said the hope is to raise a total of $13,000 between both schools.Students march to the field.It’s a friendly competition.Second-grader Kaiden Janto, 7, stops to say hi to his mother Kerri Janto.Some kids stopped for water breaks.last_img read more

Governor Shumlin appoints Oller, Mathis, Morse to Vermont Board of Education

first_imgGovernor Shumlin recently appointed three members to the State Board of Education. Sean-Marie Oller of Bennington was appointed for a six-year term. William Mathis of Goshen was appointed to complete four years of a vacated term. Stephan Morse of Newfane was reappointed to the Board for six years after completing a previously vacated term.William J. Mathis is the Managing Director of the National Education Policy Center, University of Colorado at Boulder. Previously, he served as Superintendent of Schools for the Rutland Northeast Supervisory Union, Brandon, Vermont. In this capacity, he was a National Superintendent of the Year finalist, Vermont Superintendent of the Year and president of the Vermont Superintendents’ Association. Bill has published or presented over 200 national research papers, policy briefs, newspaper columns and monographs on accountability, school quality, financial equity and adequacy, assessment, school vouchers, cost-effectiveness, history, and Constitutional issues. He frequently speaks before professional, policy, legislative and lay groups across the country on the purpose of public education, equality, and federalism. His current work focuses on the financial, programmatic and assessment aspects of accountability systems.He has worked full-time or part-time at eight colleges and universities in various teaching, research and administrative capacities. Previously, he served as Deputy Assistant Commissioner for the New Jersey Department of Education, as a guidance counselor and as a school psychologist. He is a veteran and resides in Goshen.Stephan Morse was born in Springfield, Vermont on April 1, 1947. He served as Newfane Zoning Administrator from 1971-74; on the Board of Selectman from 1974-77 and as chairman from 1975-77. Morse served in the Vermont House of Representatives from 1977 to 1984. He was Assistant Majority Leader in the Vermont House of Representatives in 1979 and Majority Leader in 1980. He served as Vermont Speaker of the House from 1981-84. He served as President and C.E.O. of the Windham Foundation until 2008. Most recently he served on the Next Generation Commission in 2006 and was appointed to the District #2 Environmental Commission in 2008. Previously Morse chaired the task force examining the Vermont State Colleges and University of Vermont systems to determine what academic and administrative efficiencies could be achieved through their consolidation.Sean-Marie Oller was born in Ohio and raised in New York City. She got to know her future home when she came to Bennington College, where she graduated in 1979. Oller continued her studies in early childhood education at New York University in 1983 and was the administrative director of the Washington Market Montessori school in lower Manhattan.Oller moved to Vermont in 1990. As she and her husband Rick raised their two children here, she worked with the Bennington College Early Childhood Center. Oller has been a mentor and project coordinator since 2003 for Quantum Leap, an organization that works with teenage students who are at-risk of dropping out. She worked with Vermont youth circuses Circus Smirkus and Circus Minimus and also volunteered with Molly Stark Elementary School in Bennington. She completed mediation training at Woodbury College in 2004. Oller was also a member of the Governors Institute board from 2006 to 2008. Oller was first elected to the Mount Anthony Union School Board in 1995, and has served as chairwoman for the last six years. She has represented Mount Anthony on the Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union School Board since 2000. Mount Anthony Union serves students in Bennington, North Bennington, Pownal, Shaftsbury and Woodford, and is the third largest school district in Vermont.Oller and her husband Rick have two children, Olivia and Jackson, who graduated from the Mount Anthony schools.The next meeting of the Board will be held on Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at the Capitol Plaza in Montpelier at 9 a.m. A complete agenda can be found at http://education.vermont.gov/new/html/board/schedule.html#schedule_agend(link is external)…last_img read more

Ranking the best classes of rookie pitchers in the post-strike era

first_imgThoughts: You could make the argument that the classes of 2010 and/or 2013 are deeper, but the class of 2008 starts with two no-doubt Hall of Famers who are still performing at elite levels, so 2008 gets the nod. Here’s guessing the fine folks in Cooperstown have already started the process for making the plaques for Kershaw and Sherzer; they just need to wait for them to finish dominating to finalize the numbers. 1. 2006The elite stars: Justin Verlander, Adam Wainwright, Cole Hamels, Jon Lester Worth mentioning: Jonathan Papelbon, Matt Cain, Rich Hill, Jered Weaver, Francisco Liriano, Josh Johnson, Anibal Sanchez, James Shields, Chad Billingsley, Jonathan Broxton, Pat Neshek, Joel ZumayaThoughts: Just so, so good. Perennial Cy Young candidates on the top line, flashes-of-brilliance guys all over and a few better-than-average consistent performers in the mix, as well. On Tuesday, we took at look at the best classes of rookie hitters in recent memory. The motivation for that trip down memory lane was, of course, inspired by the crazy-good class of rookie hitters in 2019. And though the rookie pitchers in 2019 don’t hold a candle to their position-player counterparts, we still thought it would be fun to rank the recent classes of rookie pitchers (arbitrarily drawing the line at the end of the 1994-95 strike).  As with the previous ranking, we’re looking at what the pitchers did in their careers, not what they did solely in their rookie seasons. MORE: Chris Sale is fastest ever to 2,000 strikeoutsHere’s what we did …Using the Play Index feature on Baseball-Reference, I sorted by year and pulled out every pitcher with rookie eligibility who posted a bWAR of at least 1.0 that year. And then I went year-by-year through the Rookie of the Year voting to make sure I didn’t miss anyone (still, people, don’t get me started on the flaws in a three-person RoY ballot; that’s a topic for another time). The guys we’re considering have to have made at least some impact in that year. The year with the most rookie pitchers to post a 1.0 bWAR or better: 2006, with 35.The year with the fewest rookie pitchers to post a 1.0 bWAR or better: 1998, with 18. Though, at the moment, we only have 12 rookies at that level in 2019, so that could take the title by the end of September. Anyway, let’s look at the seven best years for rookie pitchers. 7. 2001The elite stars: CC Sabathia, Roy OswaltWorth mentioning: Shawn Chacon, Joel Pineiro, Danys Baez, Juan CruzThoughts: Neither Sabathia nor Owalt won their league’s respective Rookie of the Year awards, despite fine seasons. But that’s because Ichiro Suzuki was a rookie in the AL and Albert Pujols was a rookie in the NL and both of those hitters were incredible that year, while both pitchers — who finished second, btw — were merely very good. At some point in the not-too-distant future, Sabathia will join both Ichiro and Albert in Cooperstown, though. 6. 2014The elite stars: Jacob deGrom, Trevor Bauer, Masahiro Tanaka Worth mentioning: Kyle Hendricks, Delin Betances, James Paxton, Marcus Stroman, Jeurys Familia, Kevin Gausman, Ken Giles, Jake Odorizzi, Aaron SanchezThoughts: That’s just a solid group of arms, led by deGrom and his otherworldly 2018 Cy Young campaign. 5. 1999The elite stars: Roy Halladay, Tim Hudson, Eric Gagne Worth mentioning: Kris Benson, Freddy Garcia, Billy Koch, Gil Meche, Scott WilliamsonThoughts: Halladay is the only player on this list already in the Hall of Fame, though there will be others joining him down the road (many, many others). Hudson likely will wind up short of Cooperstown (he’ll be on the ballot for the first time with the class of 2021), but that’s not a knock on what was a stellar, underrated career. And Gagne, for a time, was undeniably the best relief pitcher in baseball. 4. 2013The elite stars: Gerrit Cole, Jose Fernandez, Hyun-Jin RyuWorth mentioning: Sonny Gray, Chris Archer, Zack Wheeler, James Paxton, Tanner Roark, Julio Teheran, Michael Wacha, Trevor Rosenthal, Danny Salazar, Shelby Miller, Cody Allen, Dan StrailyThoughts: The top of this list is so tough, and hopefully another reminder what we all lost as baseball fans when Jose Fernandez was killed in that accident. And when you consider the depth of quality for the guys not on the top line, that’s really what sets this group apart. 3. 2010The elite stars: Chris Sale, Madison Bumgarner, Stephen Strashburg, Kenley JansenWorth mentioning: Wade Davis, Neftali Feliz, Jaime Garcia, John Axford, Jhoulys Chacin, Daniel Hudson, Alexi Ogando, Jonny Venters, Travis WoodThoughts: Here’s the thing about this group: None of those four pitchers on the top line received even a single rookie of the year vote. Why? Because none of those guys was in the majors for the full 2010 season, though they were all stellar in their short appearances. Sale had a 1.93 ERA and four saves in 21 relief appearances; Bumgarner had a 3.00 ERA in 18 starts; Strasburg had a 2.91 ERA in 12 starts; and Jansen had a 0.67 ERA and four saves in 25 relief appearances. And this group ranks No. 3 because, damn, all four of those guys have had great big league careers, which is what we’re primarily considering here. 2. 2008The elite stars: Clayton Kershaw, Max Scherzer, Johnny Cueto, Worth mentioning: Craig Breslow, Joba Chamberlain, Armando Galarraga, Jim Johnson, Jair Jurrjens, Hiroki Kuroda, Justin Masterson, Brad Zieglerlast_img read more

Neymars father brands Barcelona return reports fake news

first_imgNeymar’s father has debunked reports linking the Brazilian star player with a return to Barcelona in the summer.Spanish outlet El Mundo reported on Thursday that the Paris Saint Germain forward is desperate for a return after leaving he club in controversial circumstances, according to Sports Mole.Neymar Sr insists that there is no truth to the speculation, however, posting the message “Fake News from Fake News” alongside Globo Esporte’s version of events according to Sports mole.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.Neymar joined Paris Saint Germain in a controversial 222 million euro transfer in 2017 and has become fan’s favourite after scoring 46 goals from 50 appearances in all competitions.Neymar’s stay at PSG has been fraught with controversies as It was earlier reported of a fallout with Cavani after a disagreement over the team’s spot-kick taker.A return to Barcelona will see him reunite with former teammates Messi and Suarez who he had a brilliant combination with while at Camp Nou.last_img read more

Watchdog group gets 300000 to fight San Onofre waste dump

first_img Sasha Foo, October 18, 2018 Posted: October 18, 2018 Updated: 11:58 AM Sasha Foo center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN ONOFRE (KUSI) — A San Diego philanthropist is joining the battle to get millions of pounds of radioactive waste removed from the beach at San Onofre.Jennifer Moore is donating $300,000 to a group that is suing the San Onofre nuclear power plant.KUSI’s Sasha Foo has the story. Watchdog group gets $300,000 to fight San Onofre waste dump Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

How a SolarHydrogen Economy Could Supply the Worlds Energy Needs

first_imgWind: Abbott explains that wind actually comes from the sun (since the sun heats the ground creating massive convection currents, meaning that wind is a diluted form of solar power), although he shows that wind power is economically uncompetitive with solar power in all locations except cold regions with poor sun levels. Further, a typical 1.5-MW wind turbine requires 20 gallons of lubricating oil every 5 years, which would become unsustainable in a few decades. Why a hydrogen economy doesn’t make sense Explore further Citation: How a Solar-Hydrogen Economy Could Supply the World’s Energy Needs (2009, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-08-solar-hydrogen-economy-world-energy.html Unlike many other current hydrogen-powered vehicles, the BMW Hydrogen 7 directly ignites the hydrogen in its internal combustion engine. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons. Work by User: Mattes. (PhysOrg.com) — As the world’s oil supply continues to dry out every day, the question of what will replace oil and other fossil fuels is becoming more and more urgent. According to the World Coal Institute, at the present rate of consumption, coal will run out in 130 years, natural gas in 60 years, and oil in 42 years. Around the world, researchers are investigating alternative energy technologies with encouraging progress – but the question still remains: which source(s) will prove to be most efficient and sustainable in 30, 50, or 100 years from now? Despite the advantages, hydrogen fuel technology still faces challenges. For instance, the electrodes used in water electrolysis are currently coated with platinum, which is not a sustainable resource, and researchers are currently investigating other materials. Other issues include transporting hydrogen – a recent study has shown that it is more economical to deliver hydrogen by truck to refueling stations rather than perform on-site electrolysis. Another hurdle is storage – in terms of sustainability, Abbott suggests that the most straightforward approach is to liquefy the hydrogen. Although liquefying hydrogen requires an additional energy cost, Abbott argues that the scenario should not be mistaken for a zero-sum game as is the case with fossil fuels. Since the sun supplies a virtually unlimited amount of energy, the solution is to factor in the non-recurring cost of extra solar collectors to provide the energy for liquefaction. His calculations show that the cost of a solar collector farm used to produce hydrogen is still lower than a nuclear station of equivalent power.Overall, Abbott’s message is that there exists a single technology that can supply the world’s energy needs in a clean, sustainable way: solar-hydrogen. The difference in his approach compared to other analyses, he explains, is his long-term perspective. While nuclear power is often cited to be the economically favorable technology in the short-term, Abbott argues that the long-term return on nuclear power is virtually zero due to its limited lifetime, while solar-hydrogen power can theoretically last us the next one billion years. “The biggest challenge is escaping from the economic effects of vendor lock-in where large investments in nuclear and traditional energy sources keep us ‘locked-in’ to feeding monsters that will bring us down an economic black hole,” Abbott said. “It’s rather like the play The Little Shop of Horrors where a man-eating plant is initially fed small amounts, but then its voracious appetite sends it into a downward spiral swallowing up anyone that gets in its way.”Of course, Abbott’s analysis is just one approach in the ongoing debate on the advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen. Among several reviews published in a special issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE in October 2006 is an analysis by Ulf Bossel, which shows that a hydrogen economy is uncompetitive due to the energy costs of storage, transportation, etc. Abbott agrees that hydrogen is not an efficient energy storage method, but he also points out that energy from the sun is virtually unlimited, and more solar collectors could make up for the inefficiency of hydrogen technology.”The Bossel paper did not consider the case of using sun to generate the hydrogen,” Abbott said. “So, of course all the inefficiencies added up and hydrogen looked bad compared to fossil fuels. But the point about solar energy is that there is so much of it that you only have to tap 5% of it at an efficiency as tiny as 1% and you already have energy over 5 times the whole world’s present consumption.”This demonstrates that efficiency is not the issue when you go solar. There is so much solar that all you have to do is invest in the non-recurring cost of more dishes to drive a solar-hydrogen economy at whatever efficiency it happens to sit at. I show in my paper that if you do this you come out cheaper than nuclear and you take up less than 8% of the world’s desert area. … So let’s begin now, what are we waiting for?”More information: Derek Abbott. “Keeping the energy debate clean: How do we supply the world’s energy needs?” Proceedings of the IEEE. To be published.• Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook!• Follow PhysOrg.com on Twitter!© 2009 PhysOrg.com Abbott calculates that, in order to supply the world’s energy needs, the footprint of such a system with pessimistic assumptions would be equivalent to a plot of land of about 1250 km by 1250 km – about 8% of the land area of the hot deserts of the world. With less pessimistic assumptions, the land area could be reduced to 500 km by 500 km, corresponding to 1.7 billion solar dishes that are each 10 meters wide. At massive volumes, if these Stirling engine dishes could be produced at a cost of $1,000 each, the total world cost would be $1.7 trillion – “which is less than the going rate of a war these days,” Abbott noted. He also believes that further cost savings can be made by considering 30-meter diameter dishes, driving much larger Rankine engines, in order to reduce overhead and maintenance costs.Ideally, Abbott says, solar farms should be distributed widely throughout the world in order to avoid geopolitical stresses and minimize transportation costs. Solar farms of one or two square km could be built in deserts in many regions: the Americas, Africa, Australasia, Asia, and the Middle East.Hydrogen: After connecting these solar farms to the local electricity grid, the electricity could then be used to electrolyze water to produce liquid hydrogen to run our vehicles. Abbott suggests that the next step would be to power public transport, such as buses, using liquid hydrogen. Then consumers could buy liquid hydrogen cars and refuel at public transport depots for a transition period until existing gasoline stations begin providing liquid hydrogen refueling.”Governments should begin by setting up sizable solar farms that supplement existing grid electricity and provide enough hydrogen to power buses,” Abbott said. “Enthusiasts will then buy hydrogen cars, retrofit existing cars, and refuel at bus depots. Then things will grow from there. You gotta start somewhere.”According to Abbott, running vehicles on hydrogen rather than electricity is superior in terms of sustainability. The batteries in electric vehicles consume chemicals and finite resources such as lithium, and release high levels of toxic waste. On the other hand, vehicles that burn hydrogen simply emit clean water vapor, and do not require the unsustainable use of chemicals. Other advantages of hydrogen vehicles are that today’s gasoline combustion engines can be retrofitted to run on hydrogen, and the car manufacturing industry has infrastructure tailored to combustion technology.”With solar-hydrogen, questions of safe handling are not the issue,” Abbott said. “Industry already uses 50 million tonnes of hydrogen annually, and so storage and handling are well-trodden areas. The BMW company has demonstrated the hydrogen combustion engine in a family-sized car [the BMW Hydrogen 7]. Also, 20% of buses in Berlin use hydrogen combustion.”center_img At the Stirling Energy Systems suncatcher dish farm being developed in California, 38-foot-diameter dishes power track the sun and each power a 25 kW Stirling cycle generator. Image credit: Stirling Energy Systems. Credit: Derek Abbott. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. For Derek Abbott, Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Adelaide in Australia, the answer is clear. In an invited opinion piece to be published in the Proceedings of the IEEE, Abbott argues that a solar-hydrogen economy is more sustainable and provides a vastly higher total power output potential than any other alternative. While he agrees with the current approach of promoting a mix of energy sources in the transition period toward a sustainable energy technology, he shows that solar-hydrogen should be the final goal of current energy policy. Eventually, as he suggests, this single dominant solution might supply 70% of the world’s energy while the remaining 30% is supplied by a mix of other sources.”My starting point is as an academic who always thought nuclear was the answer, but who then looked at the figures and came to an inescapable conclusion that solar-hydrogen is the long-term future,” Abbott told PhysOrg.com. “I did not come at this as a green evangelist. I am a reluctant convert. I deliberately don’t even mention the word CO2 once in my paper, in order to demonstrate that one can justify solar-hydrogen simply on grounds of economic resource viability without any green agenda.”In his paper, Abbott begins by providing an overview of the major non-renewable and renewable energy sources. To briefly summarize:Nuclear fission: While nuclear fission power plants may at first seem to have the economic advantage, they have “hidden costs” (the biggest being the $6 billion cost to decommission after a 30- or 40-year lifetime). In addition, nuclear fission isn’t sustainable: if fission hypothetically supplied the world’s energy needs, there would only be five years’ supply of uranium; and thorium, a suggested substitute, has a recoverable supply of only half of the world’s uranium reserves. Nuclear fusion: Abbott argues that nuclear fusion, which usually involves the fusion of deuterium and tritium, is not actually clean or sustainable. In addition to suffering from the same hidden costs as fission, tritium is considered dangerous enough to require weekly cleaning (as in the case of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Plus, tritium is bred by reacting neutrons with lithium; Abbott estimates that the world’s lithium reserves would last about 100 years if it were to supply the world’s energy along with continuing use in industrial applications, such as batteries, glass, ceramics, and lubricants. On the left is a vehicle with a hydrogen tank, and on the right a vehicle with a standard gasoline tank. Both tanks have been deliberately punctured and ignited. The top panel shows the two vehicles 3 seconds after ignition. We see that, due to the buoyancy of hydrogen, the flame shoots up vertically, whereas gasoline is heavy and spreads beneath the vehicle. The bottom panel shows the two vehicles 60 seconds after ignition. The hydrogen supply has burned off and the flame is diminished, whereas the gasoline fire has accelerated and has totally engulfed the vehicle on the right. Note that hydrogen flames are not intrinsically visible, but salt and particles in the ambient air burn off giving color to the flame as seen above. Image credit: University of Miami. On a related note, Abbott emphasizes that we need to preserve at least some of our remaining oil for uses other than energy – such as lubricating the world’s engines, as well as for making dyes, plastics, and synthetic rubber. Likewise, natural gas has industrial applications for making ammonia, glass and plastics, and coal for making soap, aspirin, tires, and other materials.Hydroelectric: Hydroelectricity currently provides 20% of the world’s electricity, with room for further growth. However, hydroelectricity could not supply the whole world’s power due to the limited availability of waterways. Plus, dams often have negative effects on aquatic ecosystems, as well as tourism, fisheries, and transport. Abbott also notes that, like wind, hydroelectric power is ultimately powered by the sun (via rain), a reminder that tapping the sun directly can offer large amounts of power.Geothermal: Pumping water below the Earth’s crust to create steam that can be used to generate electricity, geothermal power has shown to be cost-effective and sustainable, due to the large amounts of heat contained in the Earth. The downside, Abbott says, is that much of the energy is diffuse and unrecoverable, so that geothermal power could ultimately supply only a fraction of the world’s energy needs. In some cases, geothermal is also known to trigger unwanted seismic activity, and can bring toxic chemicals, such as hydrogen sulphide, arsenic, and mercury, to the Earth’s surface.Solar: For Abbott, the unambiguous leader of alternative energy sources is solar power, especially low-tech solar thermal collectors rather than high-tech silicon solar cells. Today, the world’s energy consumption is currently 15 TeraWatts (TW) (15 x 10^12 watts). The total solar energy that strikes the Earth is 166 Petawatts (PW) (166 x 10^15 watts). Even with 50% of this energy being reflected back into space or absorbed by clouds, the remaining 83 PW is more than 5,000 times our present global energy consumption. In contrast, the above sources of renewable energy (wind, hydroelectric, and geothermal) can supply less than 1% of solar power potential. The challenge, of course, is how to harness this large source of renewable, sustainable solar energy.”The fact that there simply is 5,000 times more sun power than our consumption needs makes me very optimistic,” Abbott said. “It’s a fantastic resource. We have the ingenuity to send man to the moon, so we definitively have the ingenuity to tap the sun’s resources.”Despite the improvements in silicon solar cells, Abbott argues that they suffer from low efficiencies and high environmental impact compared with solar thermal collectors. Solar cells require large amounts of water and arsenic; Abbott calculates that manufacturing enough solar cells to power the world would require 6 million tonnes of arsenic, while the world’s supply is estimated at about 1 million tonnes. Even the overall solar cell design is fundamentally flawed, he says. Solar cell semiconductor reliability drops as temperature increases, yet large temperature differences are required to increase thermodynamic efficiency. For this reason, semiconductor technology is much better suited to lower powers and temperatures, such as pocket calculators.On the other hand, solar thermal collectors are specifically designed to operate under hot temperatures. The idea is to use a curved mirror to focus sunlight to boil water and create steam, which is then used to power, for example, a Stirling heat engine to produce electricity. The system has already been demonstrated in California’s Mojave Desert, which has been using a solar thermal system to heat oil in a closed-cycle instead of water for the past 20 years.last_img read more

The Dominance of Angry Birds From Startup to Animated Series

first_img Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Now that their namesake games are among the best-selling apps of all time, what’s left for the Angry Birds to do? If you guessed starring in an animated series, then you’re right.Finland-based Rovio Entertainment, the company behind the hit mobile game Angry Birds and its sequels, is set to launch an Angry Birds cartoon this weekend. By downloading the latest update for any Angry Birds game on any mobile device, users will gain access to a new video channel in the game where they can watch the animated show. The cartoon will also be shown on select television networks and video-on-demand channels around the world.The cartoon, featuring the game’s familiar stylized birds and pigs, will release one episode per week with a full run of 52 episodes planned. “We want to combine the feel of cartoon classics with modern twists on an unprecedented scale,” said Nick Dorra, Rovio’s head of animation, in a press release.A brief history of Angry Birds, detailing how it became a global phenomenon, follows.December 2009: Rovio Entertainment releases Angry Birds for the iOS as an app for $0.99. It is Rovio’s 52nd game and becomes the first hit for the struggling company. A version of the game will later be released for Android and Microsoft devices as well as for Facebook, and it will be followed by four sequels.February 2010: Angry Birds becomes the number-one selling paid app in Apple’s U.K. App Store and, soon after, the top-selling app in the U.S. store as well. It will hold this spot until October 2010.October 2010: The Android versions of Angry Birds (a free, ad-supported app and a paid app for $0.99) launch and are downloaded more than two million times in the first weekend.Related: Zipcar Timeline: From Business Idea to IPO to $500 Million BuyoutMarch 2011: Rovio raises $42 million of venture capital in a series A round led by Accel Partners.November 2011: The first Angry Birds store opens in Helsinki, near Rovio’s Espoo headquarters. It sells merchandise, such as plush pigs, based on the game characters. The merchandise is also available through an online store on the official Angry Birds website. In January 2013, TechCrunch reports that Rovio expects that half or more of its revenue will eventually come from physical goods.December 2011: Rovio crosses the mark for 200 million monthly active users of its games across all devices.April 2012: In Cannes, France, Nick Dora, Rovio’s head of animation, reveals plans for an Angry Birds animated series. It will be a cartoon exploring the story of the characters from the mobile games. Originally slated to debut in the fall of 2012, it is later postponed until spring 2013.September 2012: Rovio launches Bad Piggies, a puzzle game that is a spin-off to Angry Birds. It becomes the number-one app in Apple’s App Store within three hours.November 2012: Angry Birds Star Wars, the latest title in the series and a crossover with the popular science-fiction franchise, launches to great success.December 2012: Rovio now has 263 million monthly active users for its games. In a sign of Rovio games’ global popularity, China became the largest source of daily active users for the company the previous month.March 2013: Rovio announces that it will be debuting an animated series starring the characters from its Angry Birds games. The series will be distributed across a new video channel in all Angry Birds titles across all smartphones and tablets, and will also be shown on select TV networks and video-on-demand channels.”We’ve long wanted to tell our fans the story of the Angry Birds and the Bad Piggies, to introduce their personalities and their world in detail,” said Mikael Hed, Rovio’s chief executive, in a press release. By now, according to the press release, the Angry Birds game titles have been downloaded 1.7 billion times across all platforms — making them a perfect vehicle for mass video distribution.Related: How Instagram Went From Idea to $1 Billion in Less Than Two Years Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read March 14, 2013 Listen Nowlast_img read more