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After Ware’s gruesome leg injury, Louisville has extra motivation to win NCAA Tournament

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Kevin Ware’s gruesome leg injury during Louisville’s win over Duke in the Elite Eight Sunday ended his run in the NCAA Tournament, but gave the Cardinals one more significant reason to fight through the championship game. Already a formidable team with a stifling defense and balanced offense, Louisville now has added drive to win the Tournament for Ware.With just over six minutes left in the first half on Sunday, Ware ran from the lane to close out on Duke guard Tyler Thornton, who was about to shoot a 3-pointer from the right wing. Ware jumped up to block the shot, but was late. When he landed, his right leg buckled underneath him. His leg broke, and the bone broke through the skin. It left a horrendous scene until team trainers quickly covered his leg with a towel.Head coach Rick Pitino said he nearly vomited, and some of the Cardinals were close to fainting.Ware was taken to a hospital for emergency surgery. While he was there, Louisville dominated the Blue Devils, eventually winning the Midwest Regional final in an 85-63 blowout.After having the surgery, Ware is already back up and walking, Pitino said on a teleconference Monday. Pitino said he visited Ware Sunday night and said he was in “great spirits.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“He’s up and about. He’s on crutches walking,” Pitino said. “They want his blood flowing. They only thing they’re concerned about at this point in the next 48 hours, becomes the bone comes out of the skin, they’re concerned of a chance of infection. If not infection takes place, he’ll be very excited.”Pitino said Ware will likely be out of the hospital by Tuesday, and will remarkably be with the Cardinals when they fly to Atlanta – Ware’s hometown – for the Final Four.When Pitino went to the hospital Sunday night, be brought the Midwest Regional championship trophy with him and left it with Ware. He was a major reason for Louisville winning even though he couldn’t be on the court with his team.“He said ‘Just win the basketball game, I’ll be fine, get me home to Atlanta.’ He kept repeating it over and over,” Pitino said. “That was the only words coming out of his mouth to the players: Just win the game.” Comments Published on April 2, 2013 at 12:31 am Contact Chris: [email protected] | @chris_isemanlast_img read more

“Transition Day” – An Enduring and Endearing Tradition

first_imgFAIR HAVEN – Third grade students at Viola L. Sickles School hopped on boards and bikes on June 13 as part of the traditional “Transition Day” celebration. The day started with a music- and memory-filled parent show, organized by music teacher Vince Mottern and the 3rd grade staff. After a family gathering in McCarter Park, the students began their journey over to Knollwood, the school they will attend in the fall, cheered on by teachers, district administration, and incoming Superintendent Sean McNeil.Fourth graders at Knollwood greeted the prospective students, and then the youngsters were serenaded by the glee club, band, and orchestra members. Afterward, they heard a presentation about student life at Knollwood, and received an official welcome from Principal Amy Romano. “There are lots of terrific things happening here at Knollwood School that you will soon be a part of,” said Romano. “Together we will grow physically, academically, and socially.”last_img read more

A Little Summer Reading: 2019 Edition

first_img Return to article. Long DescriptionWritten By: Christopher Plein, Ph.D. West Virginia University & MFLN Military Caregiving Concentration AreaOver the past few years, when June rolls around I have offered a blog on the theme of, “A Little Summer Reading.” Past blogs have focused on such topics as recent developments in healthcare and Medicaid.  The idea of the “Little Summer Reading” series is to provide some reading suggestions on topics that are of interest to those who work with military families. A common thread that runs through all of these, and indeed much of our MFLN programming, is the close connection that exists between military and civilian life.The building blocks of our society and community, be they public institutions or public policy, or the stores, parks, and service organization that make up our communities are all shared ground. While aware of distinctions between the civilian and military world, I look for similarities and commonalities.In this regard, I am probably influenced by the work of the anthropologist, Claude Levi-Strauss. He sought to understand underlying similarities and structures across cultures. But the more I think about it, I might have also deeply influenced by my own childhood. I was raised as a child in a civilian family in the greater Washington, D.C. area. Many of my friends, mentors, and authority figures (that is my friends’ parents) were from military families. In our neighborhood, civilian and military distinctions were blurred at block parties, dinners, school functions, and backyard play. Living in this context, no doubt all the parents shared common concerns about work, home, and health.I have come across various publications that highlight the common ground between military and civilian families. One has to do with that must fundamental issues – the nature of work. The July issue of the Atlantic Magazine, has a feature article by Jerry Useem entitled, “At Work, Expertise is Falling out of Favor.”  Ostensibly, it is about new staffing arrangements in U.S. Navy littoral combat ships. The new focus is on cross-training and multiple responsibilities. The article’s broader intent is to illustrate how the nature of 21st century work is placing great emphasis on “fluid intelligence” that enables employees to handle many tasks and responsibilities.  This is a reflection of both the growing complexity of organizational systems and the downsizing of labor in favor of new technologies. The new military catchphrase is “minimal manning.” Civilian readers of this article will no doubt consider their own prospects in a time of rapid economic and technological change.If work is a constant concern for families, so too are the places they make home. Not too long ago, the magazine, Governing, which is devoted to state and local affairs and aimed primarily at public officials, offered an article entitled, “Where Housing is Least and Most Affordable for Military Families.” The challenges facing military families, especially those with lower pay grades and dependents, mirror those of the general public in attaining affordable housing. The problem is especially acute in rental housing.   For various reasons, as discussed in a Forbes website article, rental housing has become more expensive in much of the United States.  Given Permanent Change of Station (PCS) or transfer practices, this is a special concern to military families who rely greatly on off-base rental housing.For those with family members who may have special health care needs and require access to needed services and accommodations in educational systems, these pressures are intensified. This story emphasizes that military families are not immune to broader market trends in civilian housing.  Indeed, they may be even more at risk.Along with employment and housing, military families are no different than civilian families when it comes to concerns about healthcare access and coverage. Big changes have been underway with TRICARE. Our MFLN Caregiving Team has provided information on these changes through overview and topic specific webinars. The big takeaway is that military healthcare is increasingly reflecting healthcare systems found in the civilian setting. While still an affordable and enviable health coverage benefit, TRICARE is being reformed in ways that mirror larger developments in healthcare service and delivery in the United States.  Greater reliance on case management and managed care arrangements are an example of this, as the Defense Health Agency seeks to control utilization and costs. A lengthy and comprehensive review of these changes and their objectives can be found in the DOD’s own Evaluation of the TRICARE Program: Fiscal 2019 Report to Congress.Summer reading can be both light and heavy. The suggestions offered here are a mixture of both. But most importantly, they reveal how the common ground we find between military and civilian life when it comes to work, home, and health. New innovations and practices in military staffing will no doubt inform changes in the civilian workforce. The issue of affordable housing cuts across both worlds. Those in the military are seeing a healthcare system that reflects trends and practices in coverage and access provided “outside the gate.” Difference is important, but so too is recognizing all that we share. Over the past few years, when June rolls around I have offered a blog on the theme of, “A Little Summer Reading.” Past blogs have focused on such topics as recent developments in healthcare and Medicaid. The idea of the “Little Summer Reading” series is to provide some reading suggestions on topics that are of interest to those who work with military families. A common thread that runs through all of these, and indeed much of our MFLN programming, is the close connection that exists between military and civilian life.The building blocks of our society and community, be they public institutions or public policy, or the stores, parks, and service organization that make up our communities are all shared ground. While aware of distinctions between the civilian and military world, I look for similarities and commonalities.In this regard, I am probably influenced by the work of the anthropologist, Claude Levi-Strauss. He sought to understand underlying similarities and structures across cultures. But the more I think about it, I might have also deeply influenced by my own childhood. I was raised as a child in a civilian family in the greater Washington, D.C. area. Many of my friends, mentors, and authority figures (that is my friends’ parents) were from military families. In our neighborhood, civilian and military distinctions were blurred at block parties, dinners, school functions, and backyard play. Living in this context, no doubt all the parents shared common concerns about work, home, and health.I have come across various publications that highlight the common ground between military and civilian families. One has to do with that must fundamental issues – the nature of work. The July issue of the Atlantic Magazine, has a feature article by Jerry Useem entitled, “At Work, Expertise is Falling out of Favor.” Ostensibly, it is about new staffing arrangements in U.S. Navy littoral combat ships. The new focus is on cross-training and multiple responsibilities. The article’s broader intent is to illustrate how the nature of 21st century work is placing great emphasis on “fluid intelligence” that enables employees to handle many tasks and responsibilities. This is a reflection of both the growing complexity of organizational systems and the downsizing of labor in favor of new technologies. The new military catchphrase is “minimal manning.” Civilian readers of this article will no doubt consider their own prospects in a time of rapid economic and technological change.If work is a constant concern for families, so too are the places they make home. Not too long ago, the magazine, Governing, which is devoted to state and local affairs and aimed primarily at public officials, offered an article entitled, “Where Housing is Least and Most Affordable for Military Families.” The challenges facing military families, especially those with lower pay grades and dependents, mirror those of the general public in attaining affordable housing. The problem is especially acute in rental housing. For various reasons, as discussed in a Forbes website article, rental housing has become more expensive in much of the United States. Given Permanent Change of Station (PCS) or transfer practices, this is a special concern to military families who rely greatly on off-base rental housing.For those with family members who may have special health care needs and require access to needed services and accommodations in educational systems, these pressures are intensified. This story emphasizes that military families are not immune to broader market trends in civilian housing. Indeed, they may be even more at risk.Along with employment and housing, military families are no different than civilian families when it comes to concerns about healthcare access and coverage. Big changes have been underway with TRICARE. Our MFLN Caregiving Team has provided information on these changes through overview and topic specific webinars. The big takeaway is that military healthcare is increasingly reflecting healthcare systems found in the civilian setting. While still an affordable and enviable health coverage benefit, TRICARE is being reformed in ways that mirror larger developments in healthcare service and delivery in the United States. Greater reliance on case management and managed care arrangements are an example of this, as the Defense Health Agency seeks to control utilization and costs. A lengthy and comprehensive review of these changes and their objectives can be found in the DOD’s own Evaluation of the TRICARE Program: Fiscal 2019 Report to Congress.Summer reading can be both light and heavy. The suggestions offered here are a mixture of both. But most importantly, they reveal how the common ground we find between military and civilian life when it comes to work, home, and health. New innovations and practices in military staffing will no doubt inform changes in the civilian workforce. The issue of affordable housing cuts across both worlds. Those in the military are seeing a healthcare system that reflects trends and practices in coverage and access provided “outside the gate.” Difference is important, but so too is recognizing all that we share. last_img read more

Indian Athletics team reduced to 33 for Glasgow Commonwealth Games

first_imgThe AFI has decided to prune down the number of track and field participants from 41 to 33 Athletics Federation of India (AFI) has decided to prune down the number of track and field participants in the upcoming Glasgow Commonwealth Games(CWG) from the original 41 to 33, leaving out controversial triple jumper Renjith Maheswary and the six-member men’s 4x100m relay team.Indian Olympic Association (IOA) had already released the names of 224 Indian athletes to take part in the July 23-August 3 Glasgow Games, but with the reduction of members in the athletics team, the total number of participants will now be 216.Interestingly, 2010 Delhi CWG women’s discus throw silver medallist Harwant Kaur’s name was included in the list of Indian participants cleared by Sports Ministry and released by the IOA.34-year-old Harwant has not taken part in any event for the last two years, her last participation being in the National Inter-State Athletics Championships in June 2012.Her name though is not in the final list of 33.Dutee Chand, who reportedly underwent a gender test on the directives of Sports Authority of India, also found a place in the 33-member athletics team.”We have 33 Indian athletes taking part in the Glasgow Commonwealth Games. Renjith Maheswary is not there in the team and we have also pulled out the six-member men’s 4x100m relay team due to injury and also due to performance related issues,” AFI Secretary C K Valson told PTI.Valson was not forthcoming when asked how Harwant Kaur’s name was there in the list.advertisement”We sent a provisional list to IOA long time back, may be four or five months back and Harwant’s name might have been there. But, her name is not there in the final list,” said Valson, without answering on whether the AFI had committed a goof-up on this issue also by naming her in the provisional list.Valson also did not give any details about the reported gender test conducted on Dutee Chand.”I am not in a position to say anything on that issue. I have no idea on that,” he said.Eighteen out of these 33 athletes left for Glasgow yesterday.The 33-member athletics team for 2014 Glasgow CWG.Men:4x400m Relay: Rajiv Arokia, Kunhu Mohammed, Sachin Roby, Lalit Mathur, Jithu Baby, Jibin Sebastian110m Hurdle: Siddhanth ThingalayaTriple Jump: Arpinder SinghShot Put: Om Prakash KarhanaDiscus Throw: Vikas GowdaJavelin Throw: Ravinder Singh Khaira, Devinder Singh, Vipin KasanaHammer Throw: Kamalpreet Singh, Chandrodaya Narayan SinghWomen:4x100m Relay: Saradha Narayan, HM Jyothi, Sarbani Nanda, Asha Roy, Santhini Vallikkad, Merlin K Joseph, Dutee Chand4x400m Relay: MR Poovamma, Tintu Luka, Debashree Majumdar, Ratandeep Kaur, Anilda Thomas, Ashwini AkkunjiHigh Jump: Sahana KumariLong Jump: Mayookha JohnyDiscus Throw: Seema Punia, Krishna PooniaJavelin Throw: Annu Ranilast_img read more

2007 NATIONAL TOUCH LEAGUE PHOTOGRAPHS AVAILABLE

first_imgThe team from Sporting Images have compiled photographs from the 2007 Open and 20 Years and Senior National Touch League Tournaments for purchase on their website. Please click on the link provided to go directly to the 2007 National Touch League photographs.http://sportingimages.com.au/gallery/Touch/ or www.sportingimages.com.aulast_img

Russell Brand Launches New Funding For Drug And Alcohol Treatment

first_imgRussell Brand has announced funding to develop abstinence based community support for people leaving drug and alcohol abstinence treatment.The Give it Up Fund, set up by Russell, and managed by Comic Relief, will make funding available to help people remain free of drug and alcohol use through helping to develop recovery communities in three pilot areas.The idea of recovery communities is to make sure that all the local services that someone needs to sustain abstinence are available and joined up. These include housing, finding a job, support with their health needs and a range of social activities and peer support. This fund will help ensure this happens so that people can make lasting changes to their lives.Russell Brand spoke at The Recovery Group UK (RGUK) and Give it Up’s conference ‘Creating Recovery’ on Thursday 16 January 2014 at the London Film Museum. The event, sponsored by RAPt, was aimed at health commissioners, those working in the drug and alcohol treatment system and police and crime commissioners.People leaving abstinence based rehabilitation and treatment programmes are more likely to stay off alcohol and drugs if they are part of a recovery community.Russell Brand said: “It’s integral that people entering a life of abstinence after the chaos of addiction have stability, support and a role to play in the wider community. With this fund we have the opportunity to perform a kind of social alchemy turning hapless (often smelly) junkies into helpful busy bodies, pottering about and contributing. It’s the sort of scheme that even the Daily Mail could support.”Langan’s Tea Rooms in Burton-on-Trent in Staffordshire are the hub of the BAC O’Connor Centre’s Recovery Community. The Tea Rooms are run as a social enterprise that provides training, education and a safe environment for people in recovery to socialise in, join the football team or guitar club and have parties. They have provided 16 new jobs for people in the recovery community, where they gain valuable work experience as volunteers serving customers. All revenue is ploughed back into community services for people in recovery.Noreen Oliver MBE, Chief Executive of The BAC (Burton Addiction Centre) & O’Connor Centres, one of the UK’s recovery communities said: “Well over half the people we treat at our centres remain drug free after a year. This is because we have developed a recovery community, integrating individuals back into contributing to society, with on-going support.“When you look at the results, it is hard to understand why recovery communities are not being used more widely. They help people to become drug free in the long term and rebuild their lives. Social enterprises, like Langan’s Tea Rooms, can provide a fantastic model to help people to develop new skills so they can find work and tackle stigma through contact with new people. It also offers a safe space for relaxation.”The Give it Up funds will focus on sustaining abstinence based recovery. These three pilots will provide more evidence on ‘recovery communities’; how to develop them and what makes them effective. Comic Relief will also be awarding a number of small grants up to £5,000 to a range of groups run by people in recovery, and other organisations for projects which help people sustain recovery and address stigma.Gilly Green, Head of UK Grants at Comic Relief said: “Comic Relief has supported those facing addiction for many years. We’re looking forward to finding out more about the potential of recovery communities through these pilots and hearing more inspiring stories about how they can help people to recover from addiction.”last_img read more

Aaron Neville Supports Childrens Health Fund

first_imgSinger Aaron Neville is inspiring people to fundraise for the Children’s Health Fund.“Children’s Health Fund does incredible work to bring health care to America’s most vulnerable kids. I know. I’ve seen it with my own eyes,” he wrote in an email to supporters of the Children’s Health Fund. “From one of the poorest communities in the Bronx to the devastated neighborhoods of the Gulf — including my own childhood neighborhood which is still struggling to recover from Katrina — their doctors are helping kids who otherwise would not get care. And they truly need our help.“Since I have suffered from asthma my whole life, I know how important access to quality health care is. That’s why I decided to make a difference by creating an online fundraiser for Children’s Health Fund. And you can, too! Simply visit the Children’s Health Fund website and start your own personal fundraiser.“Here are a few ideas to get you started:• Dedicate your next special occasion to kids in need and ask your friends and family to make a donation instead of buying a birthday, wedding or anniversary gift.• Give yourself some incentive to meet a personal goal — maybe run that marathon you’ve always wanted to and have your friends cheer you on by donating.• Raffle your talent or skills to anyone who donates.• Have some fun and make a dare — offer to change your hair color, grow a beard, or get a tattoo if you reach your goal!“What’s great is you can do it any way you want. Everyone’s fundraiser will be different, but the end result will be the same: more kids will get the health care they need. And that’s what counts.“So please join me and start your own fundraiser. Together, we can help make sure kids throughout America are able to grow up healthy and ready to succeed in life.”To find out how to start your own fundraiser, click here.last_img read more