Tag: 苏州龙凤419

Red Bluff Joint Union High School District board to meet Wednesday

first_imgRed Bluff >> The Red Bluff Joint Union High School District will hold its first meeting of the new calendar year Wednesday at the district board room. The board will discuss and vote on several items, including the consideration of moving the track to a different location due in part to recent wind damage caused to the track, according to Wednesday’s agenda. Wind caused a portion of the track’s surface to peel up.The agenda reads that the board has two options to consider: One is to repair …last_img read more

In Mathura, Narendra Modi launches programme to vaccinate 500 million livestock

first_imgAsking people to shun single use plastic, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday said the wanton use of plastic posed a hazard to the environment and had led to livestock and fish being killed. Mr. Modi was addressing a gathering in Mathura after joining women in segregating plastic from waste at a ‘Swachhta Hi Seva’ programme. The Prime Minister sat on the floor with women who pick plastic from garbage and helped them sift through the waste. Mr. Modi, who is on a day’s visit to this Uttar Pradesh town, also launched the National Animal Disease Control Programme (NADCP) for eradicating foot and mouth disease (FMD) and brucellosis in livestock. With 100 per cent funding from the Central government till 2024, the ₹12,652 crore NADCP programme aims at vaccinating over 500 million livestock, including cattle, sheep, goats and pigs, against FMD. The programme has targeted vaccinating 36 million female bovine calves annually in its fight against brucellosis disease, a bacterial infection transmitted from animals to humans. The programme has two components — controlling the diseases by 2025 and eradication by 2030. During his visit, Mr. Modi interacted with farmers and also launched the National Artificial Insemination Programme. As part of the “Swachhta Hi Seva” programme, the prime minister met 25 garbage workers. The women wore masks and a glove and responded to Modi’s questions on garbage generated from households and the amount of plastic in them. The women were honoured for their work. Addressing the COP (Conference of Parties) to United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) at Greater Noida two days ago, the prime minister spoke of India’s resolve to end single use plastic and urged other nations to embrace the cause as well. “My government has announced that India would put an end to single use plastics in the coming years. We are committed to the development of environment-friendly substitutes and also an efficient plastic collection and disposal method,” Mr. Modi said. The government has pledged to eliminate single use plastic by 2022. As part of the effort, the government is likely to put out descriptors of what constitutes single use plastic.last_img read more

Mining dependents in Goa plan to put forth issues before Sitharaman

first_imgPeople dependent on the mining industry in Goa are planning to put forth their grievances before Union Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman when she will chair the GST Council meet here on Friday. Thousands of mining dependents will walk to the venue of the GST council meet on Friday to present their memorandum to Sitharaman, Goa Mining People’s Front (GMPF) president Puti Gaonkar said. GMPF is an umbrella organisation of people rendered jobless following the closure of the mining industry in Goa. A senior police officer, however, said adequate security arrangements were in place near the venue of the GST Council meet to avoid any untoward incident.“The mining dependents will be stopped on the way,” he said. The mining operations, a key source of revenue to the government, came to a standstill in March 2018 following a Supreme Court order which quashed 88 mining leases. The BJP-led State Government earlier requested the Centre to amend the existing mining laws so that the leases get extended. A group of Ministers under the leadership of Union Home minister Amit Shah has been trying to work out a solution to revive the mining industry in Goa. Union Mines Minister Pralhad Joshi last week said the group of Ministers has prepared a detailed report, which would be submitted to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, suggesting various ways on how to resume the iron ore extraction operations in the coastal State.last_img read more

Indigenous man sick from kidney ailment booted off Greyhound bus called drunk

first_imgJohn Murray APTN National NewsBarry Spence is an electrician who lives in the small town of Thompson, Man.He also suffers from kidney problems and the nearest health service centre to deal with his ailment is 700 km south in Winnipeg.He took a greyhound bus recently to a medical appointment for his kidneys.What happened on his way home left him shocked and alone at 4 a.m. on the side of the highway.last_img

Even After 25 Years Pete Roses Ban From Baseball Is Money in

In the long and varied history of sports heroes — from Pheidippides to Johnny Football — none has signed his name more often, nor more energetically and whimsically, than Pete Rose. Signing for dollars has been at the core of Rose’s livelihood, and lifeblood, since he was banned from baseball 25 years ago. For years now he has appeared four days a week, in five-hour shifts, at a memorabilia shop in a Las Vegas mall. The crowds don’t swarm, but they do come, steadily. An autographed ball costs $99, a bat $200, a jersey $40. Items are also bundled and sold in packages. It’s not unusual for Rose to move more than $10,000 worth of merchandise in a day.Prices and item choices are set not by Rose himself but by the company, Hit King Inc., that employs him. (He gets a flat fee for his work, but if sales pass a certain level, he receives a percentage of the extra money.) That means that when he’s signing somewhere else and has a different employer, the prices, and the menu, can vary. Just the other day, for example, Rose was in Cooperstown for Induction Weekend, where he has made almost annual autograph appearances for the past two decades. He signed at the Safe at Home shop on Main Street, less than 400 feet from the Hall of Fame to which he has been famously denied induction. In Cooperstown, customers could do a lot better for themselves than they could at The Art of Music store, Rose’s autographing venue in Vegas.Here’s a look at some of the price variability of baseballs with two popular Rose inscriptions, by retailer (keeping in mind that an autographed item for sale on eBay may be less reliably authentic than one signed in person or bought from Steiner Sports):The first inscription refers, of course, to Rose’s record career hits total; the second is a winking apology for the crime (betting on baseball) that landed him in the boat he’s in. Rose likes to lampoon his situation further: In certain circumstances he’ll sign baseballs with “I’m sorry I broke up the Beatles” or “I’m sorry I shot JFK.”Downtown Cooperstown is many things to many people on Induction Weekend but it is most conspicuously a bazaar for players selling their signatures. At any moment you can find scores of former big leaguers signing things in shops or at sidewalk tables along the narrow streets. Voices ring out, carnival-barker style, to let you know where to look for your favorite players. “Ernie Banks! A Hall of Famer, he’s right here! Come on in! Ernie Banks here today!”Special inscriptions like Rose’s are sometimes part of the transaction. This year, for example, the former Braves closer John Rocker, famous for his anti-New York rant in the late 1990s, was in town, capitalizing on the influx of Atlanta fans who’d come to see Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Bobby Cox get inducted. You could get a ball signed by Rocker for $20, plus $10 for a personal inscription. The inscription price rose to $25, though, if you wanted him to write “F New York” or “F the New York Mets.”So how does Rose’s Cooperstown fee of $60 compare with other players’ fees? Below is a look at the rate for some notable autographs during Induction Weekend. Typically, a Hall of Famer’s autograph sells for more than a non-Hall of Famer’s. So leaving out Rose’s figure, and relying on help from a pair of fine reporters (big cheers to David Bauer and Larry Mileo), I also calculated the average price for each of those two subsets of players. The autograph prices are set by the vendor and are determined, naturally, based on demand. It sometimes happened that a player appeared at more than one venue during the weekend and his autograph sold for slightly different prices. I took that into account.In comparison with Hall of Famers (the group Rose’s supporters believe he should be part of), Rose commanded 6 percent less than the average price. (Among teammates from the 1970s Big Red Machine, Rose drew about 13 percent less than Hall of Famers Johnny Bench and Joe Morgan and about 9 percent more than Hall of Famer Tony Perez.) Compared to other non-Hall of Famers, however, Rose killed it. Braves pitcher John Smoltz, who had the Atlanta contingent in town and who was billed on a price flyer as a “Future Hall of Famer” (he’ll get in next year) was the only non-Hall of Fame player whose autograph went for as much as Rose’s.Most surprising, given how long Rose has been at it and how deeply he has saturated the market for his own signature, is that his price has remained stable as he has continued to sell. At Safe at Home, the signed ball fee went up from $55 to $60 about seven years ago, according to store proprietor Andrew Vilacky, and has remained at that price. In Las Vegas, Rose’s autograph on a ball cost $79 when he was selling at the Field of Dreams in 2009. Today, at The Art of Music, he gets a 25.3 percent higher rate without any drop in volume.So why does Rose, now 73, still draw? As the eBay price in the first table suggests, no one is investing in his autograph in hopes of making much resale profit. Part of the allure is Rose’s continued fame — he may be the most famous non-Hall of Fame former baseball player alive. But there is more to it than that.What people keep buying is not just the autograph, but also the experience of getting it. Plenty of ballplayers can engage with the fan base, but nobody does it better or embraces it more than Rose does. Pete is extremely good at being Pete. You sit with him for five minutes during an autograph session. He’ll banter cornily (“Your name is Bob? Mind if I spell it backward?”) and crassly (“The whole time your wife was taking that photo with me, she had her hand on my ass”). He will give batting tips to kids (essentially, “Be aggressive”) and recall old at-bats with astounding clarity and detail. He’ll break off an anecdote about Willie Mays in a urinal, and he might, without warning or provocation, hold forth on the subject of blow jobs. However all this may sound to you, many customers clearly view it as value added. I have seen people wait to get their ball signed, spend the time with Rose, then get back in the queue and do it again.People are also drawn to Rose for the contradictions in his character — what to make of someone who both honored and dishonored the game so profoundly? Rose, through his gambling and his recalcitrance, has the lure of an outlaw hero. He’s also the only player in baseball history to be expressly denied a place on the Hall of Fame ballot, and that gives customers something edgy to discuss with him. As much as Rose might like to get inducted one day, he is not blind to the notoriety that his banishment has given him, nor to the understanding that, in the autograph trade, it may have helped his bottom line. “You know,” he once said to me. “Not being in the Hall of Fame — that’s my shtick!”For the right price, I’m sure, Rose will write that on a baseball for you. read more